search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
TECHNICAL


Renovation - Top Dressing - September 2018


in dispersing casts. We then follow up behind with a blower to clear the dispersed casts off of the courts completely, which also helps to clear any additional surface debris, prior to carrying out activities such as mowing. This may sound time consuming, but in reality it is an extremely quick process. For example, we can send out a three person team to clear eight courts of worm casts, and the job is normally complete within a couple of hours. This approach has been extremely effective this winter. It has meant we have been able to continue working on the courts, as and when the weather allows, without causing damage to the surface by smearing casts.


This sort of success has been evident across our whole approach this winter. For example, we’ve also drastically cut our use of fungicides through the winter. Ordinarily, we’d expect to apply at least three fungicides between October and March. Normally, we’d expect to react to disease pressure at least twice, perhaps


once in the autumn, and again in late winter/ early spring. Additionally, we’d look to apply a preventative around Christmas when traditionally staff take annual leave and so we have less of a presence to spot and treat proactively.


In reality, since October, aside from occasional spot treatments, we’ve only applied one full fungicide treatment. This was in November when we felt that the amount of spot treating we were having to carry out indicated that a significant disease outbreak may be possible. There is a chance that with the programme we had in place that a serious disease outbreak would never have manifested, but whilst we still have access to the safety net solution, we have the option to use it if necessary. Having the safety net also gives us the chance to try and refine our programme in order to improve its effectiveness. For example, for next winter we’re considering reducing the window between applications on our practice courts from six weeks to


just four weeks. Whilst on our Centre Court and match courts, visually the courts have maintained their colour and health, we noticed a deterioration in the aesthetic quality of the practice courts between the fourth and sixth week of our programme cycle. This deterioration is a good visual indicator that turf health was likely suffering and would therefore require addressing. This observation also ties in with the results from the broad spectrum analysis we had completed across all the courts. The results showed that our block of three practice courts have a lower Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) than the rest of our courts on site. Pitchcare Technical Sales Area Manager, Mark Allen, describes CEC as ‘the pantry of the turf; the bigger the CEC, the bigger the pantry.’ In relation to our observations on our practice courts, this makes complete sense. Effectively, our practices courts appear to have a lower holding capacity for nutrition within the soil profile, so in order to maintain turf quality and health, we have hypothesised that reducing the time between foliar applications of our winter programme, we should be able to improve the consistency of turf health throughout the programme cycle. This sort of observation, and willingness to adapt our approach, is kind of what we feel like John Handley was talking about in his article last year, referenced earlier. It isn’t enough anymore to just continue doing the same things we’ve done in the past because they worked before. Improvements can only be borne out of change, and whilst some of the changes we are having to make are borne out of necessity with changes in chemical legislation, having a perspective that sees these changes as an opportunity, rather than an obstacle, is key to continually improving our surfaces.


Mowing - Centre Court - March 2019 134 PC April/May 2019


This is why we’re being ambitious with our approach to chemical inputs; we don’t know what is going to be next in terms of label approval revocation, and so any changes we can make to reduce our reliance on synthetic products, such as fungicides, whilst improving turf health in the process is, we


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164