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By Heather Park


Fundraising events


C


reating links with the curriculum when holding a fundraiser means parents and teachers are sure to be


supportive. Moreover, giving the children a fun challenge is a great way to encourage pupils in their learning. Link your fundraiser to the project it’s supporting, for instance a sponsored read to raise money for the school library, will get parents on board and pupils excited.


Earn while you learn


To find more


in-depth event guides, visit funded.co.uk.


A curriculum-related fundraising event will support both your cause and your pupils’ education


STEM


Escape room Work with your maths team to put together a series of tricky mathematical puzzles. Avoid spending money on props by using school equipment. Test your ideas out on a small group of staff before rolling it out as an event. Charge teams of four to six players to take part and use several classrooms at once. The first team to escape wins a prize!


Beetle drive Great for younger pupils, the aim of a beetle drive is to be the first player to draw a complete beetle. The body parts are each given a number, and players take turns to roll the dice and add the corresponding body part of their beetle. This helps children with counting and number recognition. For an in-depth guide to how to run this event visit funded.org.uk/events/guides.


Codebreaking treasure hunt Turn your pupils into codebreakers with a treasure hunt around your school or local area. Work with your STEM


teaching team to establish a code that the pupils need to crack to work out the clues at each location. Charge people to take part and serve refreshments.


Science workshop Let your science team get their hands dirty with all the fun experiments they can think of. Why not host an interactive after-school science workshop that families can attend? Work together to think of exciting activities, such as making slime.


Virtual Balloon Race Rentaballoonrace.com is the world's only 100% eco-friendly virtual balloon race based on real weather data. Get businesses to sponsor balloons for pupils, who can learn about variables when picking the parameters of their balloon. Thin rubber and lots of helium will make your balloon fly higher but risk it popping sooner. The website uses weather data and geographical positions to simulate what flight path your virtual balloon takes.


PE


Jump Rope for Heart Five- to 13-year-olds can take part in the British Heart Foundation’s Jump Rope for Heart skipping challenge. Sign up for free, and receive teaching resources and skipping ropes for your school, as well as access to the online hub. Any funds raised are then split between the British Heart Foundation (80%) and your school (20%). For more details, visit bhf.org.uk/get-involved/ events/schools-events.


Sponsored run, swim or bike ride Run these events individually or group them together for a triathlon event. It’s a great way to promote exercise and get pupils practising their technique. Adapt the sponsorship according to the activity and age of your pupils. Consider encouraging the students to complete the challenge in teams for added enjoyment – and rivalry! If making a day of it then boost profits with refreshment stalls.


FundEd SPRING 2019 41


IMAGE: COURTNEY HALE/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


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