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70 HEATING, VENTILATION & SERVICES


With the health and wellbeing of the nation now firmly on the agenda, this is the ideal time for architects to lead the way with this holistic approach to building design


clean air. This draft strategy outlines the Government’s ambitions to reduce air pollution, thereby making our air healthier to breathe, as well as protecting nature and boosting the economy, with the draft setting a clear direction for future air quality policies and goals. The consultation closed in August 2018, and the final UK Clean Air Strategy and detailed National Air Pollution Control Programme is due to be published by March 2019.


Healthy buildings So, what does this mean for architects? While the Government is starting to address the causes of air pollution, until air quality improves, it is essential to look at ways of improving the quality of air being brought into buildings. One way is to specify modern ventilation with air filtration. The latest Demand Energy Recovery Ventilation (D-ERV) or Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR) units tackle air pollutants generated outside of the building, by filtering the air before supplying it to the inside of the building. By removing these pollutants from the outside air being brought into a building, air filtration systems improve indoor air quality (IAQ)


and so offer a healthier indoor environment. However, it is also important to tackle pollutants generated inside a


building such as VOCs and CO2. On-demand ventilation systems, such as D-ERV supply or extract air only when and to the level it is required improving IAQ. Sophisticated sensors monitor these ‘internal pollutants’ along with humidity and temperature and adjust ventilation accordingly, further enhancing IAQ and helping achieve a healthy building. With the health and wellbeing of the nation now firmly on the agenda, this is the ideal time for architects to lead the way with this holistic approach to building design. By marrying the benefits of ventilation and good IAQ with improved lighting, acoustics, heating and energy efficiency, not only can the physical and mental health of occupants be improved, but businesses can see improved productivity, and overall sustainability will be improved too. This all-round approach to building design is surely a win-win for everyone.


David Cook is product-marketing manager, non-residential, at Vent-Axia


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF JANUARY 2019


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