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42 PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILD & DESIGN


PATIENT-CENTRED The design reorganises traditional hospital layouts around the patient, bringing imaging departments closer – and provides spacious single rooms


new hospital would “focus on the patient’s pathway throughout the entire care process,” This meant in practice that the hospital programme would be fundamentally reorganised, bringing often traditionally distant hospital department functions much closer to the patient. Christine Hammarling sums it up: “It’s intended that the patient should not move around the building, care will come to the patient.”


In terms of the plan for the new building, a ‘Thematic’ approach looked at each care issue (infection/inflammation, cancer, neurology, heart/vascular, trauma and ‘reparative’ medicine, children and women) as a theme running through the building, which would be intersected by the related disciplines. However the location and function of these would not dictate how the ‘theme’ progressed through the building, but would instead support it. So, in addition to all patients having single rooms (increasingly common in new hospitals, partly due to infection control concerns), the supporting functions are distributed across the hospital. The stand-out example is that rather than the traditional model of imaging being concentrated in one department, there are several small imaging units. Patients spend a lot less time travelling to scans as a result, which it’s hoped will increase their sense of empowerment. Christine Hammarling comments: “This was one thing that was very new for me and the team, and was a main goal for the client.”


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The client provided an overall brief for the design competition in 2005. Christine Hammarling comments: “It was a good concept, very rational, so we didn’t needed to transform it into something else.” Instead, she says, “it was more a case of organising the different departments, restacking, which we started after the bid was submitted, together with Skanska and the client.” The hospital consists of five medium-rise ‘core’ buildings, linked via two skyways to the north – one to a new 40,000 m2


lab


and research building, and an additional double-height link connecting clinics in the new block to the radiation therapy building. Surrounding the core buildings is a low-rise ‘mantle’ which houses the hospital’s administrative areas. From west to east, the five core buildings provide, respectively: • outpatients, day care and dialysis • outpatients, day care, imaging, theatres, surgery, clinical tests and inpatient ward units


• imaging, intensive care, surgery, pre and post-op, inpatient wards


• emergency unit, trauma and imaging, surgery and imaging, intensive care, inpatient wards


• emergency, maternity, childrens ICU, daycare and imaging, neonatal ICU, inpatient wards. In this tight site, it wasn’t possible to squeeze all necessary administration areas in along- side medical templates planned according to the client’s new ‘patient first’ approach. Therefore, during the bid process Tengbom


ADF JANUARY 2019


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