search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INSIGHTS SITE LINES Mainstreaming modular


Richard Hyams of astudio describes how architects can use modular offsite construction to deliver good quality housing schemes with rich community benefits


he adoption of modular construction techniques is rapidly accelerating in the UK. Policymakers have realised the benefits of construction techniques that are up to three times quicker than more traditional construction methods, with projects delivered at a fraction of the cost. In fact, the trend towards using modular building techniques has gained so much momentum that even the Treasury is now recommending a far wider use of Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) as part of its £600bn rollout of infrastructure projects over the next decade.


T


Given the speed at which construction can be carried out and the scale of the housing crisis in the UK, it will surely not be long before increased government support for modular construction becomes widespread. Local and national government now spend £2m per day on temporary accommodation for the over 77,000 homeless households under local authority care. MMC construction techniques offer an opportunity to reduce this financial burden, while also providing high quality, zero-carbon accommodation for a great many vulnerable families. As a whole, the construction industry is under significant cost pressure. Construction is becoming more expensive, whether that’s in terms of resources, skills or materials – there are shortages everywhere. Just last year there was a brick shortage, for example. Until recently there had been reluctance among architects towards


MMC because many believed it limited creativity, skill and design. There are, however, a myriad ways to use modular – from big volume builds right down to smaller projects – that require the architect to be more agile than ever before, partly because they are using bigger components. Architects have begun to realise that working with the larger building elements used in modular design actually demands more of them, not less.


The growth in MMC is also being driven by the need to minimise the resources used, as well as deliver inspired, delightful spaces. This can be seen in East Wick and Sweetwater; two developments that astudio was involved with in east London. The housing schemes had six different architects designing different buildings to create a rich atmosphere. There were also very stringent fabric performance targets, so the facades had to perform very well, and this was before internal heating and energy systems were even considered. This meant ensuring the form and orientation were right as well as ensuring the buildings had a good air tightness level. One of the greatest challenges this project presented was the need to maximise daylight while ensuring the building didn’t overheat in the summer or become too cold in the winter. Working with an environmental engineer in house brings significant advantages. From the first design it is possible to have a


17


EAST WICK & SWEETWATER Two developments that astudio was involved with in east London show how Modern Methods of Construction is being driven not only by the need to minimise resources used, but also to deliver inspired, delightful spaces


ADF JANUARY 2019


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84