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Technical Paper


Figure 4: Depending on the process, salts can crystallise out in the cooler parts of the unit. This is a major problem for heat exchanger fouling


refractory man would know; different corrosive media cannot be handled by any refractory developed so far. By handling only one specific waste, the selection of refractory material is simplified. The word simplified has been used because it still is not easy to select the best material.


Figures 1 and 2 shows the difference between a new lining that we all see advertised on websites,


but the part not shown is the


condition shortly after start-up. Attack on the lining is to say the least; scary!


However, everyone involved in burning waste would recognise images such as shown in Figures 2-8.


Waste materials have highly corrosive


components such as sodium, potassium, chlorine, fluorine, iron, all


of which have


devastating effects on refractory materials. The higher the concentrations of each of these, the more of these components present, and the higher the temperature, the more reactive and devastating they are to the refractory lining.


May 2018 Issue


Figure 5: Corrosive media such as sodium and potassium can attack the refractory material without melting it by the formation of feldspathic minerals


ENGINEER THE REFRACTORIES 19


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