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conscious eating


offer naturally gluten-free, paleo and plant-based options never go amiss, especially when we’re talking pie. It’s easy to make a plant-based pie—think pumpkin, sweet


potato and chocolate. As a bonus, many vegan pies can be made ahead and actually taste better the next day.


Te Crust A mellow nut crust might be the best way to go; pecans or almonds, sweetened with dates, crumbled in the food processor and pressed into a pie pan. It’s deliciously easy and can be made the day before, always a plus at holiday time. Gluten-free vanilla, chocolate or gin- gersnap cookie crumbs, mixed with a little coconut oil pressed into the pan, can serve as an alternative to nuts.


THANKSGIVING


DESSERTS Plant-BasedPies


for Every Palate by Judith Fertig


G


ratitude for the bounty in our lives has been a constant in every American Tanksgiving since the Pilgrims’ first celebration at Plymouth Plantation. What has changed is


the menu. Many holiday hosts today wish to be inclusive and respect everyone’s increasingly restrictive dietary needs. A few dishes that


Te Filling Te freshest filling makes the freshest-tasting pie. Winter vegetables such as squash, small sugar or pie pumpkins or sweet potatoes can be baked in the oven and puréed in the food pro- cessor days ahead of time. Or, make the purées weeks ahead and freeze them, ready to thaw for a recipe. Award-winning cookbook author Deborah Madison, author


of Seasonal Fruit Desserts: From Orchard, Farm, and Market, in Galisteo, New Mexico, preheats her oven to 375° F. “Cut the squash in half, the pumpkins into quarters, scrape out the seeds and brush the cut surfaces with a vegetable oil such as sunflower or safflower,” she suggests. “Place the squash or pumpkins cut-side-down on a sheet pan.


Prick sweet potatoes all over with a fork. Bake the vegetables until tender, about 40 minutes,” says Madison. When baked, scoop out the flesh, discard the rinds or skin and purée the flesh in a food processor. About two cups of purée equals a 15-ounce can of pumpkin, sweet potato or butternut squash. Pies made with fresh purées will have a lighter color and flavor. Madison says she prefers natural sweeteners. “Honey and ma- ple syrup are so dynamic—they’re more like foods in their own


DEDICATED TO YOUR WELL-BEING Health Touch is a place you come to try a number of HEALING, NURTURING, SUPPORTIVE modalities that will enrich and strengthen your inner life, your physical life and your emotional life.


A GROUP OF HEALERS


At Health Touch, more than 30 professional health care practitioners work independently to care for your body, mind and spirit with the goal to improve your quality of life. These independent practitioners have


chosen to locate at Health Touch which provides a safe, professional environment so the practitioners can focus on serving you. Nearly 100 healing modalities are available to meet your health care needs.


CALL NOW TO LEARN ABOUT THE HEALTH CARE SERVICES,


HOLISTIC EDUCATION CLASSES AND LIFE ENRICHING EVENTS HEALTH TOUCH HAS FOR YOU. www.healthtouchnc.com • 919.490.4656


32 NA Triangle


HealtH toucH Nc llc • 3500 Westgate Drive, suite 405, DurHam, Nc 27707 www.natriangle.com


Lili Blankenhship/Shutterstock.com


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