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Balconies & walkways


With the right systems used the end result will be a graceful balcony that takes full advantage of the strength and aesthetic qualities of glass


the balcony or balustrade, reducing installation times and providing safety and security for the installer and end user. Juliet balconies fall under Part K of the Building Regulations Act 2000,


stipulating that gaps in any railings must not be more than 100 mm and that the top of the balcony must be at least 1100 mm from standing floor level. With glass Juliet balcony systems; less is more, and the secret here lies


very much in the strength of the handrail. The stronger the handrail the fewer supporting posts, connectors and cap rails will be required, resulting in a greater span of glass. Installers should also look for a system that makes maintenance easier, with any necessary replacement of glass panels able to be carried out from the safe side, internally, and with no need for scaffolding. Both dry glazed railing systems and Juliet balcony systems tap into


the big trend for frameless glass balustrades, and balconies have less architectural hardware, providing an improved aesthetic when compared to standard vertical posts. What hardware is on show can be chosen in a number of attractive weather-proof finishes so a minimal, high-end look can be easily achieved. With the right systems used, the end result can be a balcony that takes full


advantage of the strength and aesthetic qualities of glass, while being virtually maintenance free and very straightforward to install.


Simon Boocock is managing director of CRL Europe


34 | HMM May 2018 | www.housingmmonline.co.uk


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