search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
40 PROJECT REPORT: EDUCATION & RESEARCH FACILITIES The fast construction process, guided by


The layout of the building maximises repetition for optimum efficiency, avoiding obstacles to distribution of electrical, mechanical and sprinkler systems


BIM, delighted the subcontractors, because the facade was enclosed as each storey’s timber frame was erected, so they were working in dry, warm conditions. The construction manager told Acton: “we hate the idea of going back to concrete.” Internally, the residences resemble their counterparts on the campus, with similar amenity spaces including social and study space on the ground floor. However, Acton explains that to the discerning eye, the accuracy of CLT construction adds a different dimension: “Everything is just so square and crisp and accurate that there’s a sharpness to the units that you don’t sense in a concrete building.”


The interiors are finished to a high standard, with solid wood doors and furniture, following the building’s overall theme, to provide a “very warm, inviting and cosy” feel. The university has made a conscious effort to tell students they are in a timber building, says Acton, and they respond positively. “I have met many students on site and they love the idea of living in a mass wood building.”


Living laboratory


The university is using this pioneering but simple building as a ‘Living Laboratory’, using sensors to measure shrinkage, moisture in CLT, and wind and seismic effects. This is being done in the hope the data produced will support future changes to the Building Code for mass wood structures. The building, with its standard glazed and panelled exterior, plain facades, repeated layout and lack of exposed timber, might be seen as prosaic, but it is exactly what was required by the client to perform the function required. Acton says the ordinariness of the building is its real virtue, as it could help promulgate widespread adoption of tall timber in the mainstream to achieve the greatest carbon gains.


He admits the timber building purists may not approve, but says that it’s impor- tant to see the bigger picture: “There’s really been a bit of a disservice by some architects promoting the expression of exposed wood as almost like a mandatory, that you’re doing it wrong if you cover up the wood, it’s a sin, you’re a bad architect.” Acton concludes: “We are going to build tens of thousands of these extraordinarily ordinary encapsulated timber buildings, and this is where we are going to see the benefits of using a renewable resource.” 


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK ADF MARCH 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76