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30 PROJECT REPORT: RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS


The building could spark the dawn of a new era in high-rise accommodation


ORTHOGONAL


The other buildings on the estate are almost exclusively orthogonal in form


high-rises are conventionally characterised by the negative qualities of sameness and too much repetition.


“One Park Drive has three distinct zones offering different types of accommodation that are clearly expressed, offering a sense of individuality in a larger development.” Levels 2-9 of the building feature the Loft apartments, the first typology. These floors contain some of the largest apart- ments, with high ceilings and continuous bands of external terraces. Larger units in the Loft section offer extended outdoor space, taking advantage of their proximity to the water and the relative wind shelter afforded by their lower height. Spaces within are “free-flowing,” divided using sliding walls and pivoted screens, and they will have seamless resin floors, “sculptural” bathrooms and curved ceilings. Next, floors 10-32 form the Cluster apart- ments at the centre, containing the greatest diversity of apartment types. In this section, floorplates of each storey are mirrored but rotated. Each floor is at a different angle to the floors above and below it, creating a complex but ordered exterior, while still maintaining the clarity of the internal spaces. As the tower’s midriff, the Cluster section is made up of smaller apartments, openly expressing their rectangular forms through the building’s exterior, offset and contrasted against the cylindrical forms above and below. In a similar way, materials used inter- nally will reflect those of the exterior. The third and final typology is the Bay, covering floors 33-57. The orthogonal floor- plates with rectangular rooms again contrast


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with the external curvature of the building, providing further differentiation from a typical high rise. Each floor rotates on plan in a similar way to the Cluster apartment floors, providing double-height terraces and a dynamic and kinetic spiralling effect. The design of the Bay apartments is heavily focused on both daylighting and offering sweeping views across the capital. The Bay apartments include many of the larger two and three bedroom units, each apartment enjoying set back terraces. The large bay windows offer extensive views, and the interiors will be luxurious, featuring exposed concrete walls, timber and stone. In every typology, the geometry of the building has been “expressed without restraint through the facade”. Complexity is created, especially in the Cluster and Bay levels, through the rotation and mirroring of their floorplates. “While providing texture and change in the building’s exterior, each section maintains the cylin- drical whole, unifying the tower,” say the architects. “It’s clearly made for people to stay in and


use,” says Herzog. “It has a lot of terraces, the facade is very porous.” It’s not simply “glass in the foreground,” he further explains. “It’s like an inhabited rock.”


Terraces


The building is distinguished by its terraces forming an inherent part of the curve of the structure, with every apartment having a covered terrace. Rather than an after- thought protruding from the exterior, the outdoor areas provided in each apartment


ADF MARCH 2018


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