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INSIGHTS


15


arbitrary space standards – have to be abolished. Entrepreneurial creativity must be allowed to tailor solutions to various lifestyles and income groups.” He cites the example of The Collective, a ‘co-living’ rental-based scheme in Old Oak, Hammersmith which features substantial shared space such as gyms, pools, gaming rooms, co-working space and a restaurant, but compact 10 m2


apartments. “It is a great,


truly affordable offer, delivered by an entrepreneur unleashed from the standards that now freeze all spatial innovation.”


Future questions


Many planners want more well-planned density, but they are sensitive to reactions from local voters & councillors John Myers, director London YIMBY


productive working and networking hours.”


Schumacher believes that decision-making on housing should be liberated from planning departments: “Arbitrary, politically imposed density and land use restrictions – and especially


The big problem might turn out to be that as the new London Plan takes effect in coming years, and density increases in inner London sites (to the benefit of many communities ready to take on such vibrancy which others might read as crowdedness), that the suburbs remain largely untouched when it comes to higher density development. What of the vast swathes of land outside the North Circular, where more savvy design-led planning could mean more efficient and sustainable, denser communities with good public transport rather than the traditional miles of semi-detacheds? The Mayor expects the suburbs to produce 250,000 homes over the next decade so brave new thinking, with place-making at the core, is needed.


Interestingly, London’s population density is relatively high but in terms of land use its density is thirteenth out of 15 ‘world cities’, well below Tokyo and New York. This means that there is great untapped potential to increase density across the capital, and that architectural judgement will need to be brought to bear in order to get it right. 


ADF MARCH 2018


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