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ZHEJIANG WORLD TRADE CENTER, CHINA LEIGH & ORANGE


Leigh & Orange (L&O) has been appointmented to deliver the new Zhejiang World Trade Center (WTC) in Hangzhou. The original building was first established in 1987, designed as a key venue to facilitate foreign trade, during the early years of the Chinese economic reforms. Using the concept of a transit oriented development, or TOD, the new design will help re-zone the existing hotel-office-convention clusters, and inject a “new commercial catalyst for the business community”. Located in the heart of the Huanglong financial district, the project is primarily an underground redevelopment with a total construction area of 79,250 m2


, including 24,700 m2 of new commercial spaces. The basement retail


will be connected to the metro forming a public gathering space, a focal point for the surrounding community. Central to the design is the concept of a “retail park”, where retail space will be intertwined with an indoor sport-themed arcade and an outdoor park trail. Ref: 3816


MUSEUM OF ANTIQUITIES, NARBONNE FOSTER + PARTNERS


LUCIEN CORNIL STUDENT RESIDENCE, FRANCE A+ARCHITECTURE


A+Architecture has designed one of the highest wooden buildings in France for the CROUS: the Lucien Cornil hall of residence in Marseilles. Consisting of three wings, the design benefits of this 200-room structure benefits from very high ground floor and attics on the top two levels as well as quality shared spaces. The use of solid wood CLT (Cross Laminated Timber) limits energy consumption and provides a low carbon footprint. “The entire building has been designed to be very heat and acoustically efficient, while maintaining consistent lines and at a very competitive price,” say the architects. A perforated curved panel is mixed with large aluminium shingles to mix up the lines, reduce the scale and break- down the volumes. The perforated skin passes in front of a section of wide glazed strips, transforming the building in the evening. Ref: 2600


The building envelope of the new museum of antiquities in Narbonne, designed by Foster + Partners, is complete and press and elected officials were invited to visit the site of what will be one of the most significant cultural projects in the region. Foster + Partners’ design, devised in collaboration with museum specialist Studio Adrien Gardere, is based around the prime exhibit of the museum – a collection of more than 1,000 Roman funerary stones, recovered from the city’s medieval walls in the 19th


century. The museum’s


single storey structure with administrative offices at mezzanine level has a precast concrete roof canopy, which, inspired by Roman building techniques, provides thermal mass and contributes to a comprehensive environmental strategy. This canopy is supported by load-bearing SIREWALLs (Structural Insulated Rammed Earth) – striped in varying shades of terracotta that reflect the natural earth hues of the region. These walls also provide an engaging backdrop to the Roman exhibits on display. Ref: 7287


ADF MARCH 2018


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


©Benoit Wehrle


© Foster + Partners


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