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72 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


Historic Chocolate Works preserved with Sika Sarnafil


has a new lease of life, following extensive refurbishment. The 1926, Grade II listed building now starts a new chapter as a care village owned by Springfield Healthcare. Once home to famous brands such as Chocolate Orange, the factory and offices were closed in 2005 and fell into disrepair over the subsequent decade. Eventually the building, which is part of a 27-acre site, was acquired by Henry Boot Developments for conversion. The renovations included a full roof refurbishment that was undertaken by Hull-based roofing contractor L.A. Hall using a Sika Sarnafil single ply system. One of the key focuses of the work was to


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preserve and retain the art deco features of the building while increasing its lifespan. A vital element of the repairs was the work on the existing flat and slate roof areas that were in a very poor state, and a roof for the new


ight years after being put on the ‘At Risk’ register by English Heritage, the landmark Terry’s Chocolate Factory


additional floor of the building. L.A. Hall suggested using a Sika Sarnafil


system for the flat roof areas, as it matched the client’s requirements for longevity and sustainability, and is the company’s preferred membrane choice. The project’s conservation officer was initially concerned that the system would be too shiny, but Sika Sarnafil provided a number of samples, and after discussions, the specification was welcomed by all parties. The project was complex due to the


multiple roof areas and detailing. To begin, the existing slating on the central north light roof slopes, which were remaining in place as part of the new scheme, were re-covered using a fully adhered Sika Sarnafil system including G410-EL membrane in Lead Grey. In addition to the existing roof areas,


an extra floor to the building was constructed around the north lights. Its steep slated mansard-type external elevation included approximately 60 dormer windows,


Big Foot systems keeps things secure


Big Foot Systems has supplied Custom Frame non-penetrative systems to support and secure rooftop plant at a new, state-of-the-art leisure centre. The £11.3 million leisure centre replaced the previous 1970s sports centre and swimming pool. Along with new


swimming pools, the centre features a climbing wall, fitness suite, sports hall, dance studios, spinning studio, sauna and steam room. Big Foot’s Technical Team worked closely with the mechanical contrac- tors, to ensure the right solution was supplied to support AHUs on an exposed rooftop which experiences high, swirling wind speeds.


01323 844355 www.bigfootsupport.com Natural slate fulfils traditional charm


Crammond Select Homes has recently renovated the Powis Mains Farm in the small village of Blairlogie, one of Scotland’s first conservation villages. CUPA PIZARRAS slate was chosen as it met the specific requirements of the heritage site surrounding durability and


appearance. Bobby Halliday, the Architect commented: “Heavy 3 was ideal for this project due to its close resemblance to the traditional highland slate from Ballachulish that is no longer produced, making the CUPA PIZARRAS slate now the primary choice for traditional Scottish slate roofing, whether it be for new or refurbished roofs.”


01312 253 111 www.cupapizarras.com/uk


which required zinc on all the vertical faces and Sarnafil on the tops. The flat roof area of the extension was then also covered in the Sarnafil system, along with 140m of parapet guttering detailing, and a new roof terrace area. The L.A. Hall team overcame various challenges, including working on sloped areas, tight time scales and challenging winter weather, but thanks to the skill of the fitters and the flexibility of the Sarnafil system, the project was finished to an impeccable standard and on time.


01707 394444 gbr.sarnafil.sika.com CUPA PIZARRAS provides excellence


Natural slate remains a popular choice with architects due to the long-term durability of the material as well as the range and quality of finishes possible. CUPA R12 EXCELLENCE, one of the best selling products in the range,


provides architects with a number of aesthetic and practical benefits. The CUPA 12 is a dark grey slate with thin laminations and superior homogeneity of colour to create a uniform appearance across the entire roof. CUPA PIZARRAS employs a highly rigorous grading process to ensure the slates in the R EXCELLENCE Selection meet the highest standards in terms of consistent thickness and flat surface.


01312 253111 www.cupapizarras.com/uk Metsec provides design and walling services


Nine Elms Point is a former Sainsbury’s site in London’s Vauxhall district. Specified on the project, voestalpine Metsec plc’s steel framing systems (SFS) infill walling was selected for both its flexibility in terms of sizing, and the additional design services that


Metsec is able to provide to projects. The design services were utilised in the early stages of the project to provide the structural calculations and system requirements for the SFS walling in order to adequately support the various external wall cladding systems that Stanmore would be implementing.


0121 601 6000 www.metsec.com


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ADF FEBRUARY 2018


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