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STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


entity by adding attractive elements, colours, balconies, cornices, and so on,” says Lauri Halminen, CEO at Sisco. “A structural design approach enables reason- ably-priced production, and industrial manufacturing ensures that the projects are carried out efficiently.” Sisco’s counterpart Lapwall also believes in the logic and assembly chain approach that has been adopted from the automo- bile industry: in industrial wood construction, the work steps are clustered together and prepared in advance. All that remains to be done on the building site is to connect the parts.


“If each building is a prototype, then things become impossible,” says Jarmo Pekkarinen, CEO at Lapwall. “Our product development is based on the concept of having a range of models, with each build- ing being assembled from prefabricated parts. This allows optimal cost, quality and speed. Thanks to this approach, we can promise developers and investors that a building project can be completed in as little as three weeks.” Europe offers “plentiful partnership opportunities for element construction”,


Metsä Wood says. In France, Germany and Belgium, for example, Kerto LVL Ripa floor and roof elements are prepared by partner companies.


Here in the UK, however, according to the company, we seem to be slow on the uptake, however it adds that the “tide is slowly turning with a greater need to provide affordable, adaptable and ecologi- cal homes”.


Despite signs of progress, Metsä


Wood concludes that “more needs to be done to help housebuilders, developers and planners better realise the potential that modern wood products can offer”. This is one reason it recently launched its Open Source Wood project (www.opensourcewood.com), where architects, designers and engineers are invited to join forces to innovate and share information relating to construction based on wood elements.


The firm hopes that such initiatives will help to highlight some of the innovative projects taking place across the globe and, through collaboration, bring timber construction methods to the forefront of new housebuilding in the UK.


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Projects from conception to handover


Caledonian has the capability to deliver projects from conception through to handover from the single largest offsite manufacturing facility in the UK. Recent achievements include a partnership deal with Arcadis to develop new modular housing


design, and being appointed as an approved supplier on the EFA Framework. Projects include the largest hotel-style development in Europe for 25 years, Hinkley key worker accommodation, 1,496 en- suite bedrooms at two key locations. Also, ACS Cobham International School, Ashville College and Kidbrooke Village, London.


www.caledonianmodular.com


Offsite education projects handed over


The McAvoy Group handed over the £20m Lynch Hill Enterprise Academy in Slough 17 weeks ahead of programme, allowing the school to benefit from earlier occupation. The project is one of the UK’s largest ever modular


schools. It demonstrates a number of new innovations which contributed to its early completion and reduced the programme by around six months compared to site-based construction. Gillian Coffey, Executive Head Teacher at the Lynch Hill Enterprise Academy said, “The facilities are terrific and the children are enjoying a fantastic new learning environment and the benefits of cutting edge design.”


info@mcavoygroup.com Protect Membranes used in one of the UK’s best places to live


Protect Membrane’s TF200 breather membrane has been used throughout an innovative mixed development scheme at Little Kelham in Sheffield, to ensure water resistance, vapour permeability and minimise the risk of condensation in the wall structure. Built from a bespoke Structural Insulated Panel System by offsite construc- tion specialist Innovaré for their client, the scheme comprised of energy efficient homes, apartment blocks, shops and cafes on the site of a former steelworks. Designed to be in line with Passivhaus guidelines, the devel- opment blended old with new, restoring elements of Sheffield’s industrial heritage. Dubbed one of the 20 Hippest Places in the UK, the development was the winner of the Residential category for the RICS Yorkshire & Humber Awards. Craig Lee, Supply Chain Manager at Innovaré commented, “Aside from outstanding thermal performance, the key elements to this project were the speed and predictability offered through the offsite route of construction.” Protect will be exhibiting at ecobuild (6-8 March 2018) in the MPBA Pavilion within the Offsite District on stand H60. For more details please email Protect or call quoting ‘Little Kelham’.


0161 905 5700 info@protectmembranes.com


ADF FEBRUARY 2018


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