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Square), as it’s one of the historic city’s most famous sights. It’s not only one of Italy’s most popular, and populated tourist spots, it’s world famous. It’s so popular that the city’s mayor Luigi Brugnaro is consider- ing introducing a traffic light system to control the flow of people across the Piazza to stop overcrowding. The Procuratie, three buildings which line three sides of the square, are its dominant architecture, their famous colonnades housing extortionately-priced coffee shops. One of these high-profile edifices is the site of a major new restoration and transforma- tion project.


E ADF FEBRUARY 2018


ven if you’ve never visited, you are likely to be able to mentally picture Venice’s Piazza San Marco (St Mark’s


The oldest of three, initially constructed as a two storey building in the 12th century, the Procuratie Vecchie (translated as ‘old Procuratie’) runs along the northern side of the square for 152 metres. It faces the Procuratie Nuove (new), built in the 16th century on the south side, with the shortest of the three – the Napoleonic Wing, having been added in the 19th century on the west side. The Vecchie didn’t become the iconic, and colossal, four-storey building it is now until the early 16th century when it was rebuilt after a fire. The three-storey building was designed by Codussi and finished by Jacapo Sansovino under the then Doge Andrea Gritti’s refurbishment programme. It was one of the first buildings in Venice to


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