search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: TRANSPORT FACILITIES & PUBLIC REALM


BUILDING PROJECTS


PIONEER VILLAGE & FINCH WEST STATIONS TORONTO


New departures


When it came to designing two new subway and bus stations in Toronto, Will Alsop decided to make a departure from traditional transport hubs, and to try and provide a little joy for commuters James Parker reports


W


ill Alsop is famous for shunning timid solutions, and instead producing results that aren’t only


surprising and engaging, but also uplifting and frequently joyful. From the Stirling Prize-winning Peckham Library sitting on stilts, to the even loftier and more contro- versial Sharp Center for Design at Ontario College of Art & Design (OCAD) in Toronto, his buildings can rarely be accused of failing to grab the attention. Alsop’s practice aLL Design’s international pedigree in transport was established by the unusually spacious 1998 design for the North Greenwich Jubilee Line station, now enjoyed by millions every year visiting the O2. Already well-known in Toronto for in Toronto, the architect’s two new stations for a subway line extension in the city are also attracting interest across the world. The Spadina extension constructed by the


Toronto Transport Corporation (TTC) extends an existing subway line running north out of the city, connecting it to the neighbouring district of Vaughan. It features six new stations, which showcase the work of leading architects, including Foster + Partners who designed the new station for York University which falls between Alsop’s two stations – Pioneer Village and Finch West. The project team behind these is joint venture The Spadina Group Associates (TSGA), consisting of IBI Group, LEA Consulting and WSP, in collaboration with aLL Design. According to Alsop, the client’s ambition was six stations which were “all different, and all good,” and they certainly represent a


ADF FEBRUARY 2018


wide variety of architectural approaches, brightening what is fairly nondescript subur- ban sprawl. While Fosters’ York University stop is a sleek, futuristic and low-profile form, Alsop has applied his customary joie de vivre to two very different buildings. The TTC’s chief aim for the Spadina exten- sion was to considerably alleviate the major traffic issues many living in Toronto’s suburbs (or ‘subdivisions’) face on the roads. Will Alsop explains: “Toronto’s about 4.5 million people and growing, but the footprint is huge. The people living out in the subdivi- sions had no choice but to use a car.” As a result, many routes are congested, for example the 401, running along the shore of Lake Ontario and thought to be the busiest highway in the whole of North America, “turns into a car park” at busy times, says Alsop. The overarching ‘driver’ of the new subway extension was to “get people out of their cars.” Alsop’s firm were approached on the basis of its Jubilee Line credentials, says the archi- tect: “The TTC were aware of the Jubilee Line architecture and thought ‘we’ll have one of those,’ and to his relief it was not to be a design competition, but a direct commission. Alsop explains candidly: “[competitions] just waste so much human resource.” He says that the controversial ‘box on stilts’ he created at the Sharp Center for Design did not put the client off, as it had proved itself a positive addition to the cityscape. “It changed Toronto tremen- dously, there was a 300 per cent increase in people wanting to study at the college in


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100