search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
16 INSIGHTS


CoveBurgess PRACTICE PROFILE


James Parker spoke to Tim Burgess, one of the founders of a young practice which has quickly evolved from a two-man set up to a firm making its name in London and beyond


oveBurgess Architects has been in existence for less than six years, but it has gained a strong reputation in the commer- cial and residential sector, particularly for its varied portfolio of refurbishments. The London Bridge-based firm puts the emphasis not on esoteric architectural indulgences, but on helping clients on finding ways to maximise asset value in a simple, clear way, and provide “more with less”. Tim Burgess hit it off with his future co-director Dan Cove on the train to Bath where they were both visiting architecture tutors at the University. Tim was at MacCormac Jamieson Pritchard but was looking to set up on his own in the residential sector, and engaged Dan, a director at EPR Architects, as a “sounding board.” Dan put a few clients his way, and, says Tim, “it was a natural step for us to start a partnership.” Dan brought with him “a great black book of commercial clients, which is now the bread and butter of our work”. Tim’s background is “more complex buildings – heritage, residential, challenging refurbs and education projects, with difficult stakeholder work.” He says by contrast, Dan is “an architect with a capital ‘A’, who does the sketches and has the vision, I’m more the people person who does the collaborative thing, trying to draw things out and get everyone to that comfortable place.” They founded the practice in September 2012, with Tim’s archi- tect assistant and a former colleague of Dan’s manning the phones


C


while he sought new business. Tim tells ADF: “It was very ad hoc and low key, working all hours, and as soon as we started getting projects in we started employing people.” The firm now has nine key staff including the two partners, including associate Katharina Breuer (who Dan had worked with for a decade at EPR).


A search for clarity


Tim and Dan’s teaching careers have helped bolster the practice, with graduates from Bath now featuring among its ranks. Tom Radenz was taught by Tim eight years ago, and Oliver Bawden another qualified architect now running projects. Tim comments: “The link to teaching is fantastic because it forces you to clarify your thinking and speak in plain English. Often, you use shorthand and might say to a student ‘we need to do that in a much more Miesian kind of way’, and they say ‘what are you talking about?’” With the majority of the firm’s clients investment/pension funds and charities, Tim says that this focus on clarity and simplicity has paid dividends when it comes to providing effective advice. “It has become a touchstone – how much can we make things simple, clear and direct.” He adds: “You need to understand your clients’ world and address them in the most explicit terms. This comes through in all of our work now, particularly when we write documents for planning – short sentences, no fluff, or adjectives, simply statements of fact.”


ADDING VALUE Left – new entrance at Harbour Exchange, London Docklands; right – adding a cafe at Kingsmead Business Park in High Wycombe gave a “sense of destination”


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF FEBRUARY 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100