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LIVE 24-SEVEN - INTERIORS RI P P LES EXP L AIN HOW TO MAXIMISE SPACE IN A CLOAKROOM


Give a compact cloakroom a feeling of light and space with these clever design tricks from the team at award-winning bathroom retailer Ripples…


It may be the smallest room in the home but the cloakroom, or downstairs toilet as it’s more affectionately known, can be the most exciting and innovative. There are no design rules or practical restrictions – and with only two essential elements required (basin and WC), there are all sorts of ways you can make this space seem inviting, welcoming and more spacious than it really is…


TAKE IT TO THE WALL Starting with the sanitaryware, there are certain styles that are specifically designed with the cloakroom in mind. At Ripples, they also have a variety of compact models that are ergonomically designed in a smaller size and it goes without saying that wall-hung is the way to go! As well as creating an illusion of added floor space, it also makes it easier to clean around.


MIX IT To complement the basin look for smaller than standard basin mixers, which are in


proportion to the basin itself. A single-lever tap keeps things simple but if you want to keep the basin surround completely clear, go for a wall-mounted mixer with a good spout reach over the basin.


BIG IS BEST When it comes to flooring, a pale, neutral coloured tile will open up the space. Large


format ceramic or porcelain tiles have fewer grout lines, which makes the room feel larger. For walls, keep it simple with a fresh lick of paint in a lighter shade and add interest with a feature tile area behind the basin. If you don’t mind bringing a splash of colour into the room, this is your chance to be brave with a bolder shade. It’s not a room that’s always on show but friends and family will be utilising it, so be brave with a “wow” colour and bring some personality into the space.


MIRROR IMAGE Other clever design tricks include the use of mirrors and lighting. A large mirror hung


over the basin will bounce light back into the room and instantly add a light, bright look. Go as large as you dare! Lighting is another useful feature. Consider LED tape strips mounted beneath basins or shelves to give them a floating effect and install halogen downlights or spots into the ceiling for a layered lighting finish.


KEEP IT SIMPLE Whilst the cloakroom is a smaller space, you still want some decent storage for spare


toilet roll and soap, so look at compact vanity units with the basin on top and ample cupboard or drawer space below. Simplicity is key so avoid fussy finishes and extraneous detail. Slab-style doors and handless models are sleek and streamlined.


HAVE FUN And last but not least, think outside the box –


literally - and use every inch of space. It’s not about creating clutter but more about being creative. A series of floating shelves above the WC for instance can be used instead of a vanity unit in a really tight area. With a little careful planning, a bland cloakroom can soon be transformed into an inviting space packed with plenty of wow factor.


Ripples C/O Cookes Furniture 28 Goosemoor Lane, Erdington B23 5PN Tel: 0121 2505056


Ripples Solihull 1693-1695 High Street, Solihull B93 0LN Tel: 01564 730223


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