search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: SPORTS & LEISURE FACILITIES


45


the hall and from outside doors on the north west and south east wings. Located at the back of the hall, on the other side of the internal walkway that connects the two rectilinear boxes, the teaching area matches the height of the main hall, separated into four storeys plus a subter- ranean zone. Above the walkway, a rooftop patio overlooks both flanks.


The architect further explains the basic layout of the building: “The classroom pavilion is organised by corridors, articu- lated with staircases. He continues: “The big box, the pavilion for sports, can be entered directly from the outside, from the central control area, or directly from the changing rooms.” Below the structure, a vast basement has been employed to provide extra facilities economically. The extra space includes a swimming pool with daylighting, a gym and bathrooms, creating a versatile area to accommodate a variety of university functions.


A walkway encircles the structure, with a small incline in the pedestrian link leading up from the north east to the north western and south eastern flanks. The southwestern facade features a low strip of transparent glass, in which three sets of large doors sit. The transparency is continued around each corner on the northwestern and southeastern planes,


making the front of the building visually accessible from three sides, welcoming users into the building’s main feature, the “box of light.”


Seeing the light


The square sports hall, with its combination of opaque and more transparent facades, becomes that box of light when illuminated by sunlight, or at night with its glowing wall sections.


Continuing his legacy as ‘the architect of


light’, each elevation within the composi- tion has been carefully designed by Campo Baeza to control light to the users’ advan- tage. He comments that the building conforms to all normal standards, despite its highly minimal nature: “Every urban regulation was accomplished, but the simplicity of the box and its parallelepiped shape was still very effective.” He explained that the manner in which materials were used to control daylighting was intensified during the project, and that in the sports hall volume, different approaches were taken to each elevation in terms of facade materials to enable light to enter, but at an appropriate level. The intense Spanish sunshine needed to be carefully controlled in order to make sure that in attempting to bring in huge amounts of light, the levels are not excessive.


Each elevation has been carefully designed by Campo Baeza to control light to the users’ advantage


ADF JANUARY 2018


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76