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PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILD & DESIGN Building form


As Yeomans says, while the building “looks quite simple, it’s actually incredibly compli- cated.” The accommodation is divided into single and shared flats, in four ‘fingers’, with corridors running north-south along- side rooms and east-west across the top and bottom creating a loop to help staff easily get from one finger to the next. Shared ancillary spaces are ranged along the south flank of the building, including multi-disci- plinary team meeting rooms, activity space, a kitchen for occupational therapy, and staff rest areas.


The flats in the two easterly fingers are generously proportioned, and patients live in these when they first arrive. The overrid- ing aim is that as their ability to socially interact with others improves, they move to the smaller individual bedrooms in the other two fingers, which also have shared lounges. Then following assessment they will be able to go back into the community. Between the fingers are outdoor spaces, and all of the flats have their own access to a private ‘garden,’ laid with 4G artificial turf due to difficulties in maintaining these ‘landlocked’ secure areas. In the westernmost finger, the gardens are shared with other patients, as they get used to spending more time with people, and this is not only a thera- peutic amenity, it’s also a cost-effective one. The unit’s Kalzip aluminium roof unifies the building visually, and also overhangs slightly over gardens to enable patients to sit outside in inclement weather. The roof was an important design feature for staff, to help simplify and clarify its form, says Yeomans: “Because we have quite a complex plan going on, we thought we needed to put a sort of top hat on the build- ing to try and contain a lot of that. Even from the outside people can tell where they are – all the gables come to the end of the building and it’s immediately apparent there are four fingers.” As is common in such sensitive units, M&E servicing access is located in the roof space to avoid any disruption to the spaces below. The trust funded the construction of a full-sized mock up of a flat, which, says Yeomans, “was invaluable to just test things, work out of sizes were right, and we were able to get things like ironmongery and the kitchen workbench sorted out.” When the building was finished, a group of project team members including estates management, clinicians and Yeomans himself stayed in the unit to see if there were any glitches or equipment faults that


ADF JANUARY 2018 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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