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10 INDUSTRY NEWS


Events & awards


2017


WhatHouse? Awards 17 November, London www.whathouse.com/awards


GDPR in Housing 21 November, London www.housing.org.uk/events/


Homes 22 – 23 November, London homesevent.co.uk


Scotland Build 22 – 23 November, Glasgow www.scotlandbuildexpo.com


Care Homes & Retirement Living Conference 29 November, London www.carehomesconference.com


Home Builders Federation Ball 1 December, London www.hbf.co.uk/events-meetings


Older People’s Housing Conference 5 December, Swansea www.cih.org/eventsfinder


The Big Housing Debate 5 December, Manchester (North) 6 December, Birmingham (Central) 7 December, London (South) www.cih.org/eventsfinder


2018


Risk Management Conference 23 January, Birmingham www.housing.org.uk/events


CIH Annual Housing Awards 23 February, Belfast www.cih.org/eventsfinder


Scotland’s Housing Festival 27 – 28 February, Edinburgh www.cih.org/eventsfinder


Ecobuild 6 –8 March, London www.ecobuild.co.uk


CIH South East & London Regional Conference & Exhibition 7 –8 March, Brighton www.cih.org/eventsfinder


WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK


Brexit will intensify skills crisis: survey


More than 80 per cent of construction workers believe Brexit will damage the UK’s industry and prevent high-profile government infrastructure projects from being delivered, according to a new study. Researchers at Birmingham City University have been examining the views of people working in the sector to see how they believe jobs, projects and industry will be impacted by Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union.


The results revealed that 88 per cent of workers believed the UK relied upon EU skilled labour, and that 82 per cent thought exiting the EU would lead to the collapse of many government infrastructure projects.


Findings also showed that 86 per cent of workers expected to see a rise in demand for skilled workers following Brexit, while 92 per cent thought freedom of movement was beneficial to the UK’s construction industry.


The study was led by Marwan Mohamed, a recent Built Environment graduate from Birmingham City University, alongside Erika Pärn, lecturer in Architectural Technology at Birmingham City University. The research, entitled ‘Brexit: measuring the impact upon skilled labour in the UK construction industry’ was produced as part of Mohamed’s final year Honours Research Project (Dissertation). It has since been published in the leading scientific peer-reviewed research journal, the International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation.


Figures show housing supply gap to pass a million by 2022


England is on course to be more than one million new homes short of meeting the demands of a growing population. According to research from Search Acumen, using official figures from the UK government and the Office for National Statistics (ONS), England has been experiencing a shortfall in the number of new houses being built, compared with the number of new households being added to the population, for over a decade. Search Acumen compared the volume of new homes completed in England each year since 1976 with new dwellings needed to accommodate the growing number of households over the same period. It estimated household growth by assessing annual ONS birth, death and migration data, and used the ONS’ average annual number of people deemed to be a ‘household’ to determine how many new homes would meet the extra demand. If current trends continue, the research indicated that England will need an additional 510,000 homes to meet demand. This, on top of the current housing shortfall, means England could have more than one million too few homes by 2022.


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