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NEWS EVENTS


SEMINARS Green house: How to design a truly resilient home beyond solar panels 13 July, London www.architecture.com/whats-on


Fees: How to best calculate, negotiate and monitor 05 September, London www.architecture.com/whats-on


CDM 2015: Is your project in line with the current regulations? 19 September, London www.architecture.com/whats-on


FESTIVALS Open House London 16-17 September, London www.openhouselondon.org.uk


TRADE SHOWS Decorex 17-20 September, London www.decorex.com


100% Design 20-23 September, London www.100percentdesign.co.uk


Restaurant Design Show 26-27 September, London www.restaurantdesignshow.co.uk/


Healthcare Estates 10-11 October, Manchester www.healthcare-estates.com


Surface Materials Show 10-12 October, Birmingham www.ukconstructionweek.com/


Smart Buildings Show 10-12 October, Birmingham www.ukconstructionweek.com/


Timber Expo 10-12 October, Birmingham www.ukconstructionweek.com/


Sleep 21-22 November, London www.thesleepevent.com


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Hardwood CLT for Maggie’s Oldham MAGGIE’S CENTRE


What is thought to be the world’s first permanent building constructed entirely of hardwood cross-laminated timber (CLT) has opened in Oldham. Designed by dRMM Architects for cancer


charity Maggie’s, Maggie’s Oldham is made from American tulipwood, which is believed to be 70 per cent stronger in terms of bending than typical CLT-grade softwood. Described as a “pioneering piece of


permanent architecture,” the facility is built from more than 20 panels of cross- laminated tulipwood ranging from 0.5 metres to 12 metres in size. dRMM co-founder Professor Alex de


Rijke said: “From the Oldham project inception we knew it was the right material for Maggie’s, not only structurally and visually, but conceptually. An elevated, open plan, all-timber and glass building – with trees growing through it, and every detail considered from the perspective of use, health, and delight – was always going to be special.” According to the American Hardwood


Export Council, tulipwood CLT is one of the most sustainable timber species because of how fast it replenishes. The material used for the Oldham centre (about 116 m3


SERPENTINE PAVILION Kéré’s timber canopy in Kensington


Award-winning Burkina Faso architect Diébédo Francis Kéré designed this year’s Serpentine Pavilion, with a bold timber structure that brought his “characteristic sense of light and life” to the lawns of Kensington Gardens, London. The architect, who leads Berlin-based


practice Kéré Architecture, is the 17th architect to accept the Serpentine Galleries’ invitation to design a tempo- rary Pavilion in its grounds as their first structure in London. Inspired by a tree in his home town of


Gando, Kéré’s Pavilion “seeks to connect its visitors to nature – and each other.” The roof, supported by a central steel framework, mimics a tree’s canopy,


allowing air to circulate freely while offering shelter against rain and heat. Kéré attended the first RIBA


International Week held on 3-7 July.


of logs) would be replaced in approximately two minutes because of its vast availability and underutilisation. Other architects who have designed


Maggie’s centres include Zaha Hadid, Richard Rogers and Norman Foster.


ADF JULY 2017


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