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36


HEALTHCARE BUILD & DESIGN PROJECT REPORT


The terrace was created to be a warm roof for the day space beneath, with the attendant thermal benefits this offered


get clashes with services, but we worked them out ‘the best we could’ using clash detection software and BIM techniques.” Where these clashes were unresolvable, he says it’s about “working out carefully where you can have dropped bulkheads below the 3 m height, whilst remaining compliant.” Smith adds: “We have coffered the ceilings in service user day space areas to provide routes for services, and it helped create a sense of space and interest to the ceiling scape in these areas, providing both an attractive as well as compliant solution.”


PROJECT FACTFILE


Client: Cygnet Healthcare Architects: Tangram Architects Structural engineers: BSP Consulting Structural Engineers


Client side M&E: Harniss Engineering Project management: Fed3 Projects


Start on site: September 2015 Completed: February 2017 Number of beds: 56


Whitehead adds that one aspect of the building’s interior, that of the bespoke fitted furnishings (by Taurus) was beneficial because it made it possible to work around some of the “inevitable small intrusions” of the steel frame. He says this was particu- larly helpful in the bedrooms. The bedrooms have been designed in


pairs, with a central services riser. Whitehead says that in the 12 years the practice has been working with Cygnet, the client has moved from highly serviced buildings with full comfort cooling, to an approach much more orientated towards natural ventilation. He says the “middle ground” ventilation approach at Coventry had implications in terms of accommodating it within the frame: “There was a significant amount of plant to get through the steel frame. It was a challenge, however using BIM helped


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enormously. Structural engineer BSP modelled the frame in Revit, we modelled the building in Revit, and we could align the two.”


The building was designed to be BREEAM ‘Good’, however this meant that “eco-bling” as Smith puts it, such as solar PV, was not required. He says: “‘Good’ still demands a certain thermal perform- ance, and we used A+ materials. We looked keenly at construction methods for rainscreen, roofs, floors and insulation.” An attenuation tank was also provided under the car park for surface water run off from the roofs, and efficient boilers were employed. Experienced in working with BREEAM accreditation, Tangram are currently targeted to deliver BREEAM ‘Very Good’ on another project with Cygnet Healthcare in Maidstone in Kent. This fairly complex and sensitively designed building is also a striking example of how such psychiatric facilities can be carefully integrated into more prominent urban sites than previously seen in many cases. The expertise of Tangram, especially when novated in a Design & Build contract as they were in this case (to Clegg Construction) was critical to the building’s success. As its architect Alex Smith asserts, the practice’s role was to bring rigour not only in the initial design but also once novated: “We are there to help and where possible, working the client-side project managers, maintain design integrity.”


ADF JULY 2017


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