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44


LEISURE & SPORTS FACILITIES PROJECT REPORT


CONSULTING


The architects consulted with sporting governing bodies so that spaces were designed to be compliant with recommended standards


outdoor viewing terrace and the trans- parency of the Pavilion’s glazing brings the outdoor and the indoor together.


Transparency


Roberts explains that transparency through- out the building was a further design box to tick. “As a practice we're always talking about design from outside in and inside out. It seems obvious, but by allowing people to see what’s going on in the building glass animates it, and brings it to life.” He adds: “Internally, glass partitions allow you to see the activities taking place in adjacent areas. It makes you aware of the facilities on offer, perhaps encouraging people to use them. “And, in this parkland setting, we wanted to make the most of the views looking out. So, for example, students exercising on the third-floor fitness suite look out over the treetops.” Transparency into the building from outside is just as important. The glazing around the main approach allows people arriving at the complex to see people running up and down the sprint track, exercising in the fitness suite and scaling the climbing wall.


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Equipment suppliers’ design role


As with other sports projects elsewhere, which include Lord’s Cricket Ground and London 2012 water polo venue, David Morley consulted with sporting governing bodies so that spaces were designed to be compliant with recommended standards. Accessibility is ensured with internal spaces and circulation routes designed using Sport England Accessible Sports Facilities guidelines. However, engaging with suppliers like Continental Sports, which provided equipment for the main sports hall, was also important. Roberts says: “They had a design role [and] helped us with things like the coordination of fixture and fittings – everything from line markings and sockets for posts to roof fittings like drop-down basketball hoops and court division nets.”


Multi-purpose venue


While the DRSV’s scale sets it apart, standard construction methods – steel framework, block work walls, precast concrete slabs for the three-storey Pavilion and standing seam aluminium roofing – were employed to erect it.


But it will be more than just a sports ADF JULY 2017


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