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HEALTHCARE BUILD & DESIGN PROJECT REPORT


35


this and the transitional living unit sit outside of the secure line.


External therapeutic space Although there is a park opposite the site, across what is a busy main road, due to the constrained size of site the architects “didn’t have a great deal of options for soft landscaping” beyond a small garden at the back. Staff can allow service users to access this as part of ‘grounds leave’ whereby they are able to use landscaped areas. It was a key design goal to provide direct access to outside space for all wards to benefit patients, however while it was relatively simple to create walled courtyards on the ground floor, how could this be achieved for the locked rehabilitation unit on the first floor? The answer was to create a substantial 120 m2


terrace, which also


contributes to the aim of breaking up the building’s facade, providing visual separa- tion between the two buildings. The terrace was created to be a warm roof for the day space beneath, with the attendant thermal benefits this offered. According to Smith it “is reminiscent of a Mediterranean courtyard setting.” The design of the terrace also had to


navigate the balance between providing a feeling of openness while also ensuring the area was not overlooked. David Whitehead: “We tried really hard to avoid people overlooking into the terrace but also provide some kind of a view out. So we have a timber slat and polycarbonate sheet detail to the walls of the terrace, which are designed to be anti-climb and anti-ligature but hint at transparency.”


Smith explains further how the issues of potential overlooking from neighbours have been considered generally across the site: “Where possible, service user rooms have been located sympathetically to avoid direct overlooking.”


Ceilings, clashes & BIM


Tolerances in the design became challenging in instances where the structure, M&E services and the architecture were fighting for space, and BIM was employed to help alleviate this. HBN guidance for secure environments requires 3 metre ceiling heights in service user areas, but in a steel framed building this can be difficult to achieve in all areas. Tangram’s David Whitehead explains: “With a steel framed building, you tend to


SUPPLIERS


Internal doors & ironmongery: Kingsway Hunter Doors Windows & curtain walling: Crittall Fendor Carpets: Danfloor


Sanitaryware & taps inside of service user areas: Dart Valley External paving: Marshalls


ACHIEVING THE BALANCE


Internal spaces have been designed to avoid an institutional feel without adding risk


ADF JULY 2017


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