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EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


Shattering conventions


Neil Puttock of Boavista Windows, explains why fibreglass window frames have stirred a revolution in the glazing industry


51


GREEN WITH ENVY According to the author, fibreglass is superior to both PVC and aluminium when it comes to sustainability


n American engineer and professor by the name of William Edwards Deming once said, “Innovation comes from the producer – not the customer.” When it comes to the window industry, I couldn’t agree more. After all, there is little incentive for the customer to seek an alternative to reliable products such as PVCu and aluminium windows, when those perform adequately in terms of functionality and security. However, innovation is a natural human response to a continually changing environment and it helps us shape the world we live in by creating useful products and services. An example of this is fibreglass window frames – a sustainable alternative to plastic and aluminium, which offers durability and performance without compromising on design, function or form.


A ADF JUNE 2017 A green window of opportunity


From a sustainability standpoint, fibreglass is far superior than its PVC and aluminium counterparts due to its reliance on silica, which is naturally found in abundance. This is in contrast to the fossil fuels used to make PVC windows – a resource that is both heavily polluting and finite. A Trend Monitor report entitled Five


Key Trends which will impact on the UK home improvement industry in 2016 highlighted how the millennial consumer looks beyond the cost of a purchase and towards sustainable solutions. Using the latest pultrusion technology, fibreglass frames are created by pulling resin-soaked glass fibres through heated dyes – a process that only consumes 70 W to produce a linear metre of window frame weighing approximately 1 kg (2.2 lb).


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