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CARE HOMES & SHELTERED HOUSING PROJECT REPORT


GABLES


The gabled front elevation is a contemporary take on local Victorian hotels, with open 12 m2


balconies


quite blowy there.” The gables themselves are extended 2 metres, providing shade to east and west. The overall look satisfied the planners to such an extent that the scheme was passed without going to committee – “It’s quite unusual to get a delegated decision in a Conservation area for a major project,” Farrelly says.


The route to CLT


The client and architect had a strong desire to use a full CLT frame rather than precast or steel for the project, not only for its sustainability credentials but also because of its construction efficiency and acoustic benefits. Ashwin Halaria of structural engineer Symmetrys comments: “Because the CLT is manufactured in the factory, it can be put up very very quickly.” He adds that the fact that the client was able to purchase the site and hotel subject to gaining planning permission “really gave us the opportunity to think about how we were going to build this, and how quickly we could turn it around. It made sense to really explore the structural options, and with the client wanting to build it as efficiently as possible.” Farrelly adds, “We thought about CLT early on so we wouldn’t have to post-rationalise the design.”


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Symmetrys did a comprehensive, ‘holistic’ cost/benefit analysis on the options, looking at concrete frame, light gauge steel (LGS) and CLT, and in the end came down to a choice between precast and CLT, discount- ing steel. Halaria explains: “If you just consider the bare cost of the frame, LGS would have been the most cost-efficient. However, when you start to look at it in detail, such as the amount of steel you would need to achieve the spans, and also cost of fireproofing and soundproofing steel, you understand the benefits of each system better.”


There is a received view that CLT is the most expensive option, but Symmetrys interrogated this within its comparative analysis. It found that while the CLT frame was the most expensive option in itself at £1.25m, it was the second quickest to build


ADF JUNE 2017


A full CLT frame was the goal from the start, for its sustainability credentials, construction efficiency and acoustic benefits


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