search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


49


challenge, Protech Roofing and Sarnafil Plus delivered an exemplary solution, which allowed the market to remain open throughout. Europe’s largest covered market, Kirkgate


has 800 stalls attracting over 100,000 visitors a week. As part of a £14m refurbishment to improve the market for the stallholders and the public, the leaking roof, extending over both the 1976 and 1981 halls, needed renewing while the building was fully operational. The original design specification called for


the existing felt waterproofing to be removed back to the metal decking. However, this would cause massive disruption and with no guarantee of a watertight building. To combat this issue, Protech recommended a mechanically fastened Sarnafil system that could be overlayed onto the existing substrate. A full Sarnafil Plus survey and moisture mapping revealed the worst areas for water


Sarnafil Plus has market roof covered T


he roof refurbishment of Kirkgate Market in Leeds is a story of problem solving and partnership. Rising to the


ingress before the project started to assist with planning the work. The nine-month project saw a team of between eight and 10 people working on the roof through all four seasons, including rain showers and temperatures of over 27°C., without the project or waterproofing ever being compromised. Sarnavap 5000E SA a cold applied, self- adhesive vapour control layer was used to ensure temporary waterproofing for the market while the roofing work was being carried out. The SarnaTherm insulation boards were mechanically fixed into the existing roof and installation of Sarnafil S327-15EL Light Grey membrane with stain-


 Alumasc delivers bespoke solution


Alumasc Skyline recently designed and manufactured a comprehensive fascia and soffit system for a prestigious private residence in Jersey. The eco-friendly design, involves extensive landscaping and ecology work where quality and


style combine to form a stunning build. Alumasc Skyline’s bespoke solution, provided the perfect finishing touch. The challenge for Alumasc Skyline was to design soffits that would fit with extremely awkward overhangs, along with specially tailored nosing fascia and rainwater pipe systems.


0808 100 2008 www.alumascwms.co.uk JB Shingles take guests back in time


Marley Eternit’s JB Western Red Cedar Shingles have been specified for the roofs of 28 new medieval-themed lodges at Warwick Castle. The unique additions to the popular tourist attraction give visitors the chance to experience the medieval age like never


before. With approval from Warwick Castle, Willerby Bespoke specified JB Shingles for the lodges due to the robust finish, and the reassurance provided by the accreditation to the Certi-Grade quality assurance label. Shingles also require low maintenance and blend into the heritage surroundings, so were deemed an ideal choice.


01283 722588 www.marleyeternit.co.uk/Shingles  Save labour and time on site


Labour and time on site can be reduced by weeks by getting someone else to do much of the work- for the same material cost. Protan is now able to supply rolls of material ready welded, in its state-of-the art factory. It is the only single ply


membrane manufacturer offering the capability to UK roofing contractors. Yet the prefabricated system is cost-competitive with ‘standard’ membrane material, which still has to have on-site welding factored into the cost. Studies show that Protan’s innovative prefabricated roof process can cut welding by up to 70 per cent.


01925 658001 www.protan.co.uk 


  Redland takes the woad north


Aesthetically attractive and simple to install, Saxon 10 Slates from Redland were a straightforward choice when it came to roofing a ground-breaking £6.2 million care facility. Manufactured with a riven surface, cut back interlock, thin leading edge and


chamfered side edges, Saxon 10 Slates mimic quarried slate but have features that only machine-made tiles can deliver, such as single nail fixing and no requirement for eaves or top slates. Two vibrant colours are available: a Black that matches the black-grey slate of Scotland; and Blue, which is based on the blue-grey slate quarried in Snowdon.


01293 666700 www.redland.co.uk


less steel fixings created a durable, weather- tight and aesthetically pleasing finish. Sarnafil membranes are certified by the British Board of Agrement to have a service life in excess of 40 years, giving the client confidence in the durability and longevity of the roof. A further feature of Sarnafil roofing


systems that appealed to the client was that the Sarnafil S327-15EL Light Grey membrane is cold applied – welde together using hot air rather than with a naked flame. The system can be used without restrictions as it meets the fire performance requirements of BS476-Part 3:2004 and BS EN 13501-5:2005. Six rooflights over 51m long were replaced


with SarnaLites, situated close together in rows, making sure that the market continued to benefit from natural daylight. This part of the refurbishment was carried out at night to limit any disruption to the market below. Sarnafil Plus visited the site regularly and


a successful final inspection resulting in the issuing of a Sarnafil Plus guarantee.


01707 394444 www.sika.co.uk


ADF JUNE 2017


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92