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INSIGHTS PRACTICE PROFILE Hogarth Architects


From radical refurbishments and modern extensions to ventures into housing development, Hogarth Architects has made a success of the residential sector, as Teodora Lyubomirova found out


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tick to what you’re good at – this has been the underlying notion underpinning Hogarth Architects’ business philosophy, according to Ian Hogarth, director of the practice. However, while this might suggest playing safe, the west London architects have made a name for themselves designing ‘radical refurbishments’ – exemplar modern extensions displaying a bold vision for incorpo- rating space and light into schemes.


Formed in 2003 out of the ashes of Littman Goddard Hogarth, where Ian was a partner before the trio decided to split, Hogarth Architects had fairly tough beginnings. “When we started in 2003, it was literally me and an assistant working in my daughter’s bedroom,” says Ian Hogarth. Within four years, the firm had moved into what is still the practice office, at the corner of Dawes Road and Estcourt Road in Fulham. He says the key to success was start- ing with low overheads and focusing on a single sector – residential – instead of competing with other practices for ‘massive buildings’. The office is itself an example of the architects’ transformative approach to space. In owning it, Hogarth is in the unusual role of a landlord and tenant of this modest basement and ground floor property, which had previously been used for various functions ranging from a grocery store to a massage parlour before the archi- tects turned it into “a nice place to work.”


This was done through a careful adaptation of the internal spaces to fit in a naturally-lit reception and waiting area at upper level, with a translucent glass wall through which visitors can see the architects working downstairs. There’s also a subsidised canteen at the back and a secluded meeting room near the reception. Downstairs, the architects – consisting of three associates, three project architects, and a number of architectural assistants in the process of completing their professional qualification – sit together in an area that enables them to “call out from where you sit and talk to every member”, as Hogarth puts it. When asked whether there’s a desire to expand elsewhere in the


capital, Ian concedes that a move to a central London location could be on the cards, particularly if an opportunity to transform the current premises into housing arises. He jokes, “My older practice used to have very swanky offices on the river and we used to watch the river all day and lose money,” adding, “I think we are settled in this size at the moment.”


Cosmopolitan ethos


The 18-strong team at Hogarth Architects is formed by a multi- national bunch of professionals from a range of countries including Greece, Lithuania, Slovakia and Canada. “We are


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VERTICAL LIVING The practice’s refurbishment of an apartment in Oakley Street, Chelsea


VICTORIAN TWIST The bright new build development at Ash Row, Bude, in Cornwall


ADF JUNE 2017


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