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the planned route and actual route. Street speed is an important aspect of routing that Tyler’s app takes into consideration. For example, the speed limit on a particular road may be 40 mph, except for certain hours of the day when it slows to 25 mph, due to children being present. Tyler’s


software also takes into consideration situations where loading takes longer than expected every morning. In Tyler’s software, “Tere is


a routing component, and we compare the route plan to what the bus actually does on the road. Te planned routing data may have five


students at a stop, but in reality, there is no one there. We also have data that tells us how the bus driver is performing,” says Sam Catalano, manager of product direction and central quality assurance. “To keep the data up to date, student tracking data is compared to the planned routing data. A report is generated to show when the bus actually arrived at those stops and at school.” Catalano added that it is the


parent’s responsibility to inform the school if they’ve moved, or if the child no longer needs transportation. “Te data can only be accurate if the school has all the information,” he said. “Anytime parents have feedback, we encourage the district to share it with us.” Tyler Tech offers two platforms.


MyStop works with Versatrans routing and allows parents to see where the bus is, and to receive automatic notifications when their child has scanned on or off a bus. Te district can also send push notifications and filter the criteria to a certain bus or certain students. Tyler Tech’s other platform is Traversa, a next generation system that provides an all-in-one solution for fleet main- tenance, routing, trips and GPS data, Catalano explained. “With Traversa, parents can go in and see where and when their child will be picked up. A lot of the problem districts have is to get parents the information that they need, without necessarily making a phone call. It’s still the transportation department’s responsibility to keep the information in the system accurate, so the parent receives the correct information,” he said. In conclusion, there are many


factors to consider in choosing the right platform to help schools communicate with parents more effectively. Perhaps as more districts realize that it’s worth investing in communication technology, parents need not worry about shooing children out the door to wait for the big yellow bus, or where they travel from that point on. 


58 School Transportation News • OCTOBER 2018


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