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Special Report


A view of the “Danger Zone” displayed in a Eugene School District bus driver’s rearview mirror.


that process. Te other thing is you get these real tiny kids in kindergarten, and when they get really close to the bus, you can lose sight of them if you’re using just mirrors.” Tauscher explained that the driver has a 360-degree view of the bus and a magnified view of the right side of the bus when activating the amber lights. When the door opens, the driver gets a view of the right side and the front of the bus. “When the driver puts on a right turn signal, they get a 360-degree view plus a magnified view of the right side of the bus,” Tauscher added. “Te same [happens] when the left turn signal is on.” When the bus is in reverse, the system displays not only a 360-


degree view, but also a magnified view behind the bus. “Our drivers just love it, it’s done a lot for morale and for safety,” Tauscher said.


“Tey feel much safer loading and unload- ing students. Te last thing you want is to be in a situation where you say, ‘We should have done this.’” Chris Ellison, director of transportation for the Eugene School District 4J in Oregon, has had a 360-degree camera system since August 2017. Ellison explained that the district connects an electronic control unit


for the Seon inView 360 four-channel cameras to a Rosco Vision Systems Backup Monitor on his 10 newest Tomas Built Buses HDX. He said that while student safety is the primary reason for the system, it also helps reduce the number of minor accidents. “Primarily, it was student safety, because we didn’t want students in the danger zone. Secondarily, it was the cost of the minor accidents we were having,” Ellison said. “Te thought process was that if the drivers could see all around the bus, it would mitigate all the head-slapping accidents we were having, like backing into a mailbox or turning too tight and hitting a power pole.” Ellison said that while he cannot justify the system on his special needs buses, he will eventually specify the 360-degree system on all


28 School Transportation News • OCTOBER 2018


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