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[RIGGER’S CORNER] COMPETENT OR QUALIFIED?


Crane Tech, LLC is a leading training, inspection and consulting service firm located in the Tampa, FL. area. Recently, they were asked whether it is required to have a third-party perform OSHA inspections on cranes. Here is their answer and further thoughts on the subject.


OSHA is very clear that cranes must receive inspections on a regular basis and under various circumstances, and these inspections must be performed by either competent or qualified persons. However, there is nothing in U.S. Federal OSHA for cranes operating in a construction environment or general industry environment that requires this person to be a third-party inspector. While this seems very straightforward, there are several areas that invite clarification. Tere are many types of inspections required by OSHA under 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC. Tese are shown in two tables, broken out by the type of inspector required. As noted, there are two different types of persons who can


provide inspections: Competent and Qualified. According to OSHA a “competent person” is defined as


“one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.” A “qualified person” means “a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, successfully demonstrated the ability to solve/resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.” Only employers can deem employees as competent or qualified. Not a training provider, not an individual, not the employee themselves. Te company is responsible for assigning this title. In most cases companies are able to appoint a competent person. Tis person needs to have in-depth knowledge of the subject matter (i.e. being able to spot concerns or identify issues) and the authorization to do something about the findings. For certain inspections, the competent person may be the crane operator.


A qualified person will be someone with a higher


level of knowledge and experience. In order for an employer to justifiably appoint an employee as a qualified inspector they must have three things documented: inspector training, testing and inspection experience. Individuals can also become a “Certified Crane Inspector” by obtaining a national-level certification, such as the National Commission for the Certification of Crane


80 NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2016 WIRE ROPE EXCHANGE


Operators (NCCCO) Mobile Crane Inspector certification, Generally, those seeking this certification are already experienced, qualified inspectors looking to advance their credentials. Only you can choose the right persons to perform inspections for your organization, be that a designated employee or a third party. However, a vendor like Crane Tech can assist in either case. Teir Inspector Course provides the training, knowledge, and testing


PERFORMED BY A QUALIFIED PERSON Modified Equipment Inspection Repaired/Adjusted Equipment Inspection Post Assembly Inspection Annual Inspection Severe Service Inspection


Equipment Not in Regular Use Inspection (idle 3 months or longer)


Wire Rope Annual Inspection PERFORMED BY A COMPETENT PERSON


Shift Inspection Monthly Inspection Wire Rope Shift Inspection Wire Rope Monthly Inspection


pieces for qualification. But the employer is ultimately taking the risk that the employee will perform the inspection properly, so some companies prefer hiring a third-party like Crane Tech to provide inspection services. Regardless of your choice, treat your inspector as a partner


in safety! Remedy any deficiencies found promptly in order to keep your crew safe and your business secure. Visit Crane Tech at cranetech.com for more information.y


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