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With eight doubled-over wire rope slings suspended on its lift beams, the VB 10,000 prepares to connect the rigging to hooks which have been pre-welded onto the jacket in preparation for lifting.


…FOR ALL ITS INNOVATIVE DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS, THE REAL “SECRET” OF VB-10K’S EFFICIENCY AND VERSATILITY IS THE NEARLY 70,000 FEET OF WIRE ROPE SPOOLED ON THE 28 WINCHES IT EMPLOYS TO GET THE WORK DONE.


inventory, we can highlight a multi-phase operation which took place earlier this year in the Gulf of Mexico. Having been issued a contract to decommission a field of four topsides in addition to their jackets, Versabar engineers set to work to determine to optimum methods for performing a total of thirteen VB 10,000 lifts with an aggregate weight of more than 11,000 tons. One of the key drivers in the engineering process was to significantly reduce offshore construction time and personnel exposure by modifying Te Claw, Versabar’s subsea lifting tool. Tis modification enabled the VB 10,000 to lift the structures by their legs below the topside deck level, thus avoiding offshore equipment removal and the cutting of process piping. Te subsequent rigging package, which used not only Te Claw, but also two purpose-built 175’ box girders each weighing 400 tons, was one of the heaviest ever assembled for an offshore lift. Before the lift system could get underway from its


base in Sabine Pass, Texas, following SOP, Versabar personnel used the eight tieback winches to secure the lift rigging against the motion of the barges and protect the integrity of the system’s 240-foot-tall twin gantries. Once this was done, the lead tug picked up the tow


The VB 10,000, with a 1,170-ton topside secured in the arms of “The Claw,” maneuvers away from the jacket from which the topside has just been lifted.


WIRE ROPE EXCHANGE


NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2016


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