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Wild orchids are very fragile and should never be moved.


adds Ben. Their efforts seem to have been rewarded as Ben reports having seen “dozens and dozens” more butterflies last year. Thanks to the range of habitats on the peninsula, Tober-


mory and its surrounding area is also home to 43 different types of wild orchids. “The plants are very fragile and they bloom where they are happy. So you leave them alone and just enjoy them,” Ben says. Both men are protective of the fragile plants, a testament to their respect for nature. Taking in the view, Klaus, the retired harbour master


quotes Vita Sackville-West, the acclaimed British writer and late-in-life gardener: ‘Let self-seed plants grow where they naturally fall,’” pretty much summing up the pair's own gardening philosophy. Tobermory has changed over the years, but to them


it will always be home. Both Ben and Klaus are happy in their homes at the end of the road, with their rugged gardens and whimsical, self-willed wildflowers. x


“If a plant decides to grow some- where, who am I to argue? If a


flower pops up somewhere I


did not plant it, it must want to grow there,


so I let it be,” says Klaus.


localgardener.net Early Spring 2015 • 11 Above: Purple lupine basks in the sun. Below: Tiger lily.


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