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CRM


Information gathering helps the operator to address customer needs and interests


IMPROVING CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS IN SPORT


We ask four experts how CRM can aid retention and encourage long-term loyalty in the sport and active leisure sectors


TOM WITHERS HEAD OF SALES AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, GLADSTONE HEALTH AND LEISURE


sure industry is driving its evolution in an effort to better communicate with members and pros- pects by addressing their


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specific needs and interests – making their experience feel personal and relevant. Most leisure management software captures a wealth of data – including demographics, usage, visit profiles and customer spend, but good software can


DARREN BOXALL MD, XN LEISURE


continuous strategic investment in people, systems and processes that specifically meet the needs of the leisure industry, of which self-service elements and online functionality are viewed as the next progressive step for the sector. Our partnership approach allows us to work with a carefully selected choice of hardware and technology providers. For example, we’ve teamed up with Prot- ouch, one of the UK’s leading suppliers of touch screen and kiosk systems, to


X Issue 4 2011 © cybertrek 2011


n Leisure is engaged in a programme of


Self service elements and online functionality are the sector’s next progressive step


provide efficient solutions for payment, ordering, product look-up and ticket printing services which utilise chip and pin, RFID, keyboard, Bluetooth, web cam- eras, printers, scanners and WiFi. Our recent partnership with Fife Sports


and Leisure Trust is a good example of our customer-centric approach. An initial con- sultation allowed us to understand the


specific challenges faced by the trust and this highlighted the fact that the busiest part of its operation was the reception – the first point of contact for information, bookings, payment and interaction with the customers.


Through our collaboration with Prot- ouch, we developed a turnkey self-service kiosk – or virtual receptionist solution – to automate the processes via an easy-to- navigate interface to make the reception processes faster and more efficient. This has allowed the trust to provide a wider range of services, reduce costs and, at the same time, empower the reception staff to offer a more effective standard of primary customer service.


Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital 51


RM software is growing rapidly smarter. The lei-


enable leisure operators to make the cor- rect choices in how they segment this data and ultimately speak to individuals. At Gladstone we have launched Con- tact Manager, a clever software bolt-on for our core Plus2 product that enables operators to maximise the efficiency and effectiveness of any customer-focused strategy. It works with the captured cli- ent preferences, processing personal information and automating time-based actions, which can be used to support the management of sales leads, the roll-out of marketing campaigns, for tracking


customer service communication and to aid management reporting. The system is designed to improve customer relationships, increase loyalty, identify customers that should be given a higher level of service and decrease cus- tomer turnover. It can encourage repeat purchases, decrease marketing costs and increase sales revenue profit margins. In a world of diverse communication, where customers choose how we talk to them and what information they want to receive, listening and responding to those preferences is more important than ever.


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