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EVENT PLANNING – 12 KEY STEPS


1. Eliminate as much uncertainty from bid delivery and beyond – early planning of who, what, where, when, how and why for areas such as budget, technical requirements, delivery model and operations 2. Leverage the distinct value – of the event, the city, the country, the movement or sport 3. Create an event personality not just a brand – give it a time, a place and purpose 4. Give selflessly – for event planning and management the journey is as important as the destination. Be aware that the IOC is a time-based organisation, your partners will be around significantly longer 5. Spend time on a strategy at bid stage that involves all stakeholders and has a clear plan for delivery 6. Develop a sound budget that translates to fiscal control rather than hinders front-line management 7. Put yourself in the position of all stakeholders and mentally walk through their experience 8. Get the best people – hand- pick your team and check their actual delivery experience 9. Secure support from the top – develop and build relationships so there is confidence and trust 10. Define structure and responsibilities – at both planning and in event management mode 11. Keep your hands free – ensure guidelines are in place so there is clarity on delivery and senior management can oversee and provide additional resource to address any inevitable problems 12. Work hard and enjoy!


• Ability to offer robust commercial models, with greater commercial opportunities and reduced risk – given a typical underwriting of the financial model due to a keenness to host.


While this growing trend will result in an increasingly competitive events market and may limit the UK’s potential to at- tract future events, it does provide an opportunity for event professionals in the UK to work with emerging countries and share their international experience.


IMPORTANCE OF LEGACY Legacy is the long-term, sustainable ben- efit that may be created from bidding for and hosting a major sporting event. It creeps into virtually all events-re-


lated presentations and discussions, emphasising how integral it is to event planning and delivery.


Issue 4 2011 © cybertrek 2011


With major sports administrators in attendance (including Lord Seb Coe: top left and above) delegates were offered great networking opportunities at the event management conference


It can take many different forms, such


as sporting, economic, social and environ- mental with hard legacy benefits relating to facilities and infrastructure and soft benefits to lifestyle and cultural changes. It’s widely accepted that any success-


ful bid will need to demonstrate a positive legacy impact. The issue is balancing what is right for both the host city and the rights holder, i.e. managing the demands of the rights holder with the city’s long-term needs. The general perception is that in Olympic and Paralympic terms only Barce- lona in 1992 has successfully managed this.


ADDING TO THE EVENT EXPERIENCE Adding consumer value to an event is an increasing trend. Examples included: • Fan parks. First introduced at the 2006 FIFA World Cup. These offer com- mercial benefits, educational and interactive legacy and help to build-up and generate interest • In-event opportunities. Using digital media to bring the spectator expe- rience to life and provide a better understanding of the sport • Sports presentation. Entertaining and educating spectators i.e. at the 2011 Daegu IAAF World Championships ‘ssshhhh’ sound effects prior to the gun and use of six split big screens to illustrate the technical detail of events.


Helen Delaney is a senior consultant at pmplegacy


Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital 23


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