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2012 PROFILE NEWS AND JOBS UPDATED DAILY ONLINE AT WWW.SPORTSMANAGEMENT.CO.UK Mike Hay


The BOA’s head of winter sport engagement is responsible for delivering the London 2012 preparation camp at Loughborough University for Team GB


Can you tell me about your background? After 20 years as an athlete – having won medals at World Junior, European and World Championships – I retired in 1997 and took the post of high perfor- mance curling coach with the Scottish Institute of Sport and performance di- rector for GB curling. Under my programme leadership


between 1998-2006 the Institute teams were successful in winning World Junior, European, World (men’s and women’s) and Olympic Gold medals (Salt lake 2002). Other successes included coaching Europe to a record win over North America in the 2006 Continental Cup – curling’s version of Golf’s Ryder Cup. Following the Turin 2006 Olympic Win-


ter Games, I joined the British Olympic Association (BOA) as Olympic perfor- mance manager for Winter Sports. As part of the BOA’s HQ team I have attend- ed the Beijing 2008 Olympics, Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games and also European and Australian Youth Olympic Festivals. Next January I’ll be the deputy chef de mission to Clive Woodward at the inaugural Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria.


What does your current role consist of? I cover all areas of performance and gov- ernance for the seven Olympic winter sports. As part of the BOA’s performance


team along with Tanya Harris (head of summer sport engagement) and Dave Reddin (head of performance services) we currently report directly to Clive Woodward (director of sport).


What’s involved in delivering the Preparation Camp at Loughborough University? There are five main deliverables that we are focusing on 1. Training facilities for 23 disciplines/ teams including facility upgrades, equipment provision and venue configuration.


2. Residential accommodation for athletes, officials and other Team GB clients’ groups.


3. Performance services to fully support athletes and officials.


4. Team GB Experience incorporating ‘kitting out’ for all team members.


5. Logistics and operational services to support sports in a safe, secure, accredited environment.


What facilities does the university offer to Team GB? Centrally located in the heart of the UK, Loughborough University is arguably the leading university in the country for its world-class sport training facilities across a number of Olympic disciplines. It offers four-star accommodation


located within the University Campus, which allows for exclusive Team GB areas,


We aim to provide the transition from the athletes’ regular training, to a multi-sport environment before the Games


Issue 4 2011 © cybertrek 2011


Loughborough University offers extensive world-class training facilities for athletes


within which athletes, coaches and of- ficials can be properly ‘kitted out’ during the six-week period prior to the Games. Practitioners and service providers


from the English Institute of Sport (EIS) will also be on campus and able to give the consistency and quality of elite train- ing delivery that the Olympic sports are used to contracting.


What lessons do you bring from Calgary and Macau? The reason for transiting through the Team GB Preparation Camps in Macau and Calgary en-route to the Olympic Games in Beijing and Vancouver were to acclimatise the athletes to a new time zone, and adapt to a new environment and culture. Next year’s ‘home Games’ will offer unique challenges. We aim to provide the transition from the athletes’ regular home training to a multi-sport training environment before the Olympic competition, this is particularly relevant for sports with little or no multi-sport or Olympic experience.


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