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historian Neal Hotelling said. “Morse’s focus at that time was selling real estate and real estate on a golf course sells better than anywhere else.” The Oakland Tribune caught wind of this plan, and


wrote, “An 18-hole tournament golf course, a next door neigh- bor to Pebble Beach, will be constructed by the NCGA. NCGA officials have selected a 300-acre site called Indian Village, which lies between the Pebble Beach and Cypress Point courses.” The story even quoted Jones, who said, “It should be


one of the spectacular courses in the nation.” Jones called this new course “Pebble Pines,” but Morse


wasn’t all that enamored with the working title. Nonethe- less, the project now had legs. The NCGA just had to figure out the financing. Del Monte Properties President Richard Osborne


proposed that: “The Northern California Golf Association would build a golf course on ground furnished by us and turn it over to us on the condition that for a period of 50 years they could have exclusive use of the course for seven weeks out of the year.” By early 1963, a lease and management agreement was


formed. As part of the agreement, 250 Founders would pay $2,500 each as members (with annual dues of $50). Those


dues entitled the member to “annual golfing privileges between 8:30 and 10 a.m. on weekdays and between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. on weekends and holidays.” The $625,000 collected from the members more than


covered the estimated cost of design and construction, which Jones slated at $430,000. With the NCGA’s quest for a home course nearly


complete, it still had to figure out a name. Among the contenders: Pebble Pines, Bird Rock, Indian Village, White Sands, Hillcrest Golf Links and Whispering Pines. Morse was also a fan of Spyglass Hill, because of the connection to Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic novel, “Treasure Island.” In a meeting between Watson, Hanna and four other


NCGA officials, all were discussed and eventually voted on. Three votes came in for Pebble Beach Pines, but that was not a majority. There were no more than two votes for any of the others suggested names, and Spyglass Hill had received none. Seeing that they could not agree, the six made it easy


on themselves and chose Morse’s favorite: Spyglass Hill. Next, it was on to relocating the NCGA offices from San Francisco to Pebble Beach.


The fourth and fifth holes at Spyglass Hill as pictured shortly after the course’s opening in a photo by then-NCGA Executive Director Bob Hanna. 38 / NCGA.ORG / SUMMER 2014


PHOTO: BOB HANNA/PEBBLE BEACH COMPANY LAGORIO ARCHIVES


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