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Solutions


CHESS TO ENJOY (page 17)


Problem I. U.S. Championship 1946 1. Bc8! and Bxe6 wins the trapped knight at h3.


Problem II. U.S. Open 1946 1. ... Nf3+! 2. gxf3 Qg5+ 3. Kh1 Qf4 threatens mate on h2 (4. Ng4 Qxd2).





Problem III. Ventnor City 1939 White won after 1. Rg1! Qf3+ 2. Qxf3 but 2. Kh2+! leads to mate. Also, 1. ... Kf8 2. Kh2! followed by 3. Qh8+ leads to mate.


    


 


SOLITAIRE CHESS ABCs of Chess (page 19)


Problem I. Pin: The simple capture 1. ... dxe4 gains material.





 


Problem II. Pin: After 1. ... gxf4 White is going to lose material.


Problem III. Skewer: Black gains the Exchange by 1. ... Nxg2. If 2. Kxg2, then 2. ... Bh3+.





Problem IV. Trapping: After 1. ... g5 White’s queen has no way out. The knight soon snares it.


 


Problem V. Trapping: Black traps the queen with 1. ... Nf4.





Problem VI. Mating net: The game ends with 1. ... Qh5 mate.


 


Total your Solitaire Chess score to determine your approximate rating below:


Total Score 95+


 


 51-65


81-94 66-80


36-50 21-35 06-20


0-05


2200-2399 2000-2199 1800-1999 1600-1799 1400-1599 1200-1399 under 1200





 uschess.org





Approx. Rating 2400+


CHESS LIFE USPS# 102-840 (ISSN 0197-260X). Volume 67 No. 2. PRINTED IN THE USA. Chess Life, formerly Chess Life & Review, is pub- lished monthly by the United States Chess Federation, 137 Obrien Dr., Crossville, TN 38557-3967. Chess Life & Review and Chess Life remain the property of USCF. Annual subscription (without membership): $50. Periodical postage paid at Crossville, TN 38557-3967 and additional mail- ing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chess Life (USCF), PO Box 3967, Crossville, Tennessee 38557-3967. Entire contents ©2012 by the United States Chess Federation. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise without the prior written permission of USCF. Note: Unsolicited materials are submitted at the sender's risk and Chess Life accepts no responsibility for them. Materials will not be returned unless accompanied by appropriate postage and packaging. Address all sub- missions to Chess Life, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557-3967. The opinions expressed are strictly those of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United States Chess Federation. Send all address changes to: U.S. Chess, Membership Services, PO Box 3967, Crossville, Tennessee 38557-3967. Include your USCF I.D. number and a recent mailing label if possible. This information may be e-mailed to addresschange@ uschess.org. Please give us eight weeks advance notice. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 41473530 RETURN UNDE- LIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO EXPRESS MESSENGER INTERNATIONAL P.O. BOX 25058 LONDON BRC, ONTARIO, CANADA N6C 6A8


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 


 


 


  Chess Life — February 2012 71


Problem IV. U.S. Open 1946 1. Qa2! wins a piece, e.g. 1. ... Qxb5 2. Rb1 or 1. ... Bb7 2. Qa7.


Problem V. U.S. Open 1946 1. h6! threatens 2. Rxd7 Qxd7 3. Qf6 and 4. Qg7 mate, e.g. 1. ... Qd8 2. Ba4! Nb6 3. Qf6 or 2. ... f6 3. Qd5+ or 2. ... Re8 3. Rxe8+ Qxe8 4. dxc5 (4. ... dxc5 5. Qd2). While the game continuation is the strangest, 1. hxg6 will also do the job.


Problem VI. U.S. Championship 1948 1. ... Re8 2. Qd2 Re2!, e.g. 3. Qxd3 Rxf2+ 4. Kg1 Rxb2 followed by ... Bxc3 or ... Bc5+, or 4. ... Qxd3 5. Rxd3 Bc5 (6. Ne4 Rxh2+ 7. Nxc5 Rxh1+ 8. Kxh1 Nf2+).


ENDGAME LAB Benko’s Bafflers (page 49)


Problem I. 1. Rd4+ The first thematic try is 1. Re5+? Kxe5 2. Bxh6 a1=Q 3. Bg7+ Ke4 4. Bxa1 Rc1 5. Rf4+ Ke3, how- ever White cannot force a win. 1. ... Kxd4 2. Bb2+ Ke3 3. Rf3+ 3. Re2+? Kd3 4. Kxc5 Rh5+ 5. Kb4 a1=Q 6. Bxa1 Rb5+ 7. Kxb5 stalemate. 3. ... Ke4 4. Kxc5 a1=Q 5. Bxa1 Rc6+ 6. Kb5! wins. Of course not 6. Kxc6? yielding stalemate. 6. ... Rc5+ 7. Ka6 Rc6+ 8. Kb7 Rc1 9. Rf4+ Kd5 10. Bd4 wins.


  


 


Problem II. 1. Re4 The thematic try is 1. Rxb4? c2 2. Rc4 Bg6 3. Kg3 Kg1 Zugzwang 4. Kf3 Kf1 Zugzwang 5. Ke3 Ke1 Zugzwang 6. Rc8 Kd1 7. Rd8+ Kc1 8. Rb8 h5 9. Rb4 Kd1 10. Rd4+ Ke1 11. Rc4 Bf5 12. Kf4 Bd3 wins for Black.


The real solution runs: 1. ... Kg1 2. Rxb4 c2 3. Rc4 Bg6 4. Kg3 Zugzwang 4. ... Kf1 5. Kf3 Zugzwang 5. ... Ke1 6. Ke3 Zugzwang 6. ... Kd1 7. Rd4+ Kc1 8. Rb4 Kd1 9. Rd4+ Ke1 10. Rc4 Bf5 11. Rc5 Kd1 12. Rd5+ Ke1 13. Rc5 Bg6 14. Rc4 h6 15. Rc8 (15. Rc7; 15. Rc5) 15. ... h5 16. Rc6 Zugzwang 16. ... Kd1 17. Rd6+ Ke1 18. Rc6 Bf5 19. Kf4 Bd3 20. Kg5 Draws.


 


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