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2011 World Youth


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After 25. Qd5+


25. ... Bf7?? Black falls apart in the complications,


losing a lot of material. 25. ... Kh7! Going over the game afterwards this move con- cerned us. It seems that it wins for Black. 26. bxa8=Q Rxa8 27. Qxa8 Qxc5+ 28. Kh1 Bxa1 (28. ... e3!?) 29. Rxa1 e3.


26. bxa8=Q Rxa8 27. Qxa8+ All of a sudden Sarah is up two


Exchanges.


27. ... Be8 28. Qd5+ Bf7 29. Qd8+ Kh7 30. Qe7 Qxb3 31. Qxe4+ Kg8 32. Rad1 Nf6 33. Rd8+ Kg7 34. Bf8+ Kg8 35. Bxh6+ Be8 36. Qg6+, Black resigned.


Mate follows on g7. Mariya employed her favorite anti-Sicil-


ian weapon (the Wing Gambit) to good effect in the following game. White’s devel- opment and pressure caused a terrible blunder.


Sicilian Defense (B20) Mariya Oreshko (FIDE 1694, USA) Karamcheti Priyamvada (FIDE 1782, IND) World Youth 2011 (5), 11.22.2011


girls under 12 along with Agata Bykovt- sev, both at 61


.


1. e4 c5 2. b4!? The Wing Gambit is a tricky gambit


that isn’t seen much nowadays. The idea is to clear out Black’s wing pawn and gain control of the center.


2. ... cxb4 3. a3 bxa3?! White gets too much play after this.


Declining the gambit is best with 3. ... d5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. Nf3 (5. axb4?? Qe5+ 0-1 was the unfortunate game Shirazi-Peters, 1984 U.S. Championship, Berkeley) 5. ... e6 6. Bb2 Nf6 7. c4 bxc3 e.p. 8. Nxc3 Qd8 was coach Armen’s excellent prepa- ration from last year’s World Youth in Greece. In Vetoshko-Troff, White was down a pawn in an isolated-pawn position with zero attacking chances.


34 Chess Life — February 2012


Mariya was one of our top scorers in the ⁄2


4. d4 g6 This was Mariya playing white two


rounds earlier versus Nominerdene: 4. ... d6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bd3 e6 7. 0-0 (7. c3 Be7 8. Qe2 0-0 9. e5 dxe5 10. dxe5 Nd5 11. h4 It might be easier for White to create kingside threats without castling. The Rh1 could help with Bh7 Ng5 ideas) 7. ... Be7 8. Bxa3 0-0 9. e5 Ne8 10. Nc3 with attacking chances in a French Defense type position.


5. Nf3 Bg7 6. Bc4 d6 7. 0-0 Nf6 8. e5!?


White needs to play aggressively or the compensation could dry up. 8. ... dxe5 9. Nxe5 0-0 10. Bxa3 White’s bishops are exerting great pres-


sure on Black’s kingside, making developing difficult.


10. ... Nc6 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. Re1 Re8 13. Bc5 a5 14. Qf3 Bb7??


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After 14. ... Bb7 Black cracks under the pressure. 14. ...


Ba6 gives Black good defensive chances.


15. Qb3! This nasty double attack wins a lot of material.


15. ... Ba6 16. Bxf7+ Kh8 17. Bxe8 Nxe8 18. c3 Bf6 19. Qa3 Bd3 20. Bxe7 Bxe7 21. Qxe7 Qxe7 22. Rxe7 a4 23. Na3 Nd6 24. Re6 Rd8 25. f3 Kg7 26. Re7+ Kh6 27. Rc7 Bb5 28. h4


How about 28. Rc1!.


28. ... Re8 29. g4 g5 30. hxg5+ With 30. Nxb5!? cxb5 31. Rc6 Black’s


remaining forces will be tied up.


30. ... Kxg5 31. Kf2 Kf4 32. Nxb5 cxb5 33. Rd7 Re6 34. Rb1 Rh6 35. Rxd6!


This simplifying combo takes care of Black’s small hopes. 35. ... Rxd6 36. Rxb5


The mate threat allows White’s rook to get behind Black’s passed pawn.


36. ... Rf6 37. Ra5 h5 38. Rxh5 a3 39. Ra5 a2 40. Rxa2 Rh6 41. Kg2, Black resigned. Jeffrey Xiong finished with an excellent


Ruy Lopez (C77) FM Jeffrey Xiong (FIDE 2056, USA) Joshua Johnson (FIDE 1862, TRI) World Youth 2011 (2), 11.19.2011


In this game Jeffrey takes care of his Trinidadian opponent in tactical style.


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d4!?


One of the many “trappy” tactical lines White can try. 5. ... b5


Black’s results from this position are


horrible. 5. ... exd4!? 6. e5 Ne4 7. 0-0 Be7 8. Nxd4 Nxd4 9. Qxd4 Nc5 is a much better and safer path than what Black played in the game.


6. Bb3 exd4 7. e5 Ng4 8. 0-0 Be7 9. Bf4 Bb7 White has compensation after 9. ...


h5!? 10. c3 g5 11. Bd2 Ngxe5 12. Nxe5 Nxe5 13. cxd4 Nc6 14. Qf3 because of Black’s unsafe king.


10. Bd5 Qb8 11. Bxc6 dxc6 12. Nxd4


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After 12. Nxd4 Already Black is in big trouble.


12. ... Nh6 13. Bxh6 gxh6 14. e6 c5 15. exf7+ Kf8 16. Ne6+ Kxf7 17. Nxc5!


Winning a pawn and leaving Black with a leaky king position.


17. ... Rg8 18. Nxb7 Qxb7 19. g3


This forced defensive move ends any hope Black has for attack or defense.


19. ... Rg5 20. Nd2 Bf6 21. c3 Rd8 22. Qc2 Rg6 23. Rad1 Qc8 24. Ne4 Rdg8 25. a4 h5


uschess.org


7-2 score, good enough for fifth place in the open under 12. Still it had to be a bit of a disappointment after last year’s unbe- lievable 9-2 and second on tiebreak finish (tied for first place). I like Jeffrey’s style: good, crisp, aggressive chess mixed with good preparation. He’ll be a perennial contender as he moves up in the age groups. This game shows Jeffrey catch- ing his opponent in a theoretical spin cycle. Black was in trouble early with no chance to defend.


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