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20. ... exf4 21. Bxf4 Bg7


Black is under heavy pressure with 21. ... Nfd7 22. Rf1 Qe7 23. Ng4. 22. Rad1 Ng8 23. Nf3


Playing for a timely e4-e5. 23. ... Bb7 24. h4!


r+-wqr+n+ +l+-+pvlk psn-zp-+pzp +pzpP+-+- -+-+PvL-zP +PzP-+NsN- P+LwQ-+P+ +-+RtR-mK-


After 24. h4 White is picking apart Black’s kingside.


24. ... Nf6 25. h5 Bc8 26. hxg6+ fxg6 27. Bb1 Bg4 28. Qc2


Loading up for e5!


28. ... Nh5 29. Nxh5 Bxh5 30. Rf1 Rf8 31. Be3 Bxf3?


The ... Bh5 was holding things together.


32. gxf3 Qh4 33. Rd2 Nd7 34. Rh2 Qg3+ 35. Rg2 Qh3 36. Rh2 Qg3+ 37. Qg2 Qe5?


White has chances to blast g6 after 37.


... Qxg2+ 38. Rxg2, but at least Black is still playing.


38. Qh3! This simple double attack does the job.


38. ... Nf6 39. Bxh6 Nh5 40. f4 Qf6 41. e5, Black resigned.


One of our oldest representatives was


Eric Rosen, who competed in the open under 18. Eric started the tournament with a rank of 27, meaning a lot of hard work and highly-ranked opponents lay ahead of him. He was up to the task. Con- gratulations to Eric for making an international master norm. Seven out of Eric’s nine opponents were higher-rated, making his 6-3 score an impressive achieve- ment. Here is one of Eric’s easier victories:


Closed Ruy Lopez (C87) FM Eric Rosen (FIDE 2305, USA) FM Toms Kantans (FIDE 2338, LAT) World Youth 2011 (5), 11.22.2011


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. 0-0 a6 5. Ba4 Nf6 6. Re1 Be7


A good way for Black to develop in the Steinitz system is 6. ... Bd7 7. c3 g6 8. d4


uschess.org


Bg7. Black could also try 6. ... b5 7. Bb3 Na5 gaining the bishop pair, but falls behind in development after 8. d4 Nxb3 9. axb3.


7. c3 0-0 8. h3 b5 9. Bc2 d5?!


r+lwq-trk+ +-zp-vlpzpp p+n+-sn-+ +p+pzp-+- -+-+P+-+ +-zP-+N+P PzPLzP-zPP+ tRNvLQtR-mK-


After 9. ... d5


An odd-looking move, getting into some kind of Marshall but down some time. 10. d4!? Compare the position after 10. exd5


Nxd5 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Rxe5 c6 13. d4 to a Marshall and we must agree this is good for White.


10. ... Nxe4 11. dxe5 f5 After 11. ... Nc5!? the game has trans-


posed into an Open Ruy Lopez-type of position.


12. exf6 e.p. Nxf6 13. Bg5 Bc5 14. Nbd2 Qd6 15. Nb3 Bb6 16. Nbd4 Nxd4 17. cxd4 Ne4 18. Bxe4 dxe4 19. Rxe4 Qg6?


r+l+-trk+ +-zp-+-zpp pvl-+-+q+ +p+-+-vL- -+-zPR+-+ +-+-+N+P PzP-+-zPP+ tR-+Q+-mK-


After 19. ... Qg6 The bishop move 19. ... Bb7!? 20. Be7


Qd7 21. Bxf8 Bxe4 leaves Black down a pawn, but with some chances.


20. Qb3+ Kh8 21. Rae1 h6 22. Be7 Bf5 23. Ne5, Black resigned.


Black’s queen lacks a good square. Our highest-scoring girls were WCM


Sarah Chiang, Mariya Oreshko and Agata Bykovtsev. Take a look at Sarah’s han- dling of the Petrosian variation against her Brazilian opponent. The game starts off as a positional struggle favoring White, but the early c4-c5 push allowed crazy complications.


King’s Indian Defense, Classical Variation (E92) WCM Sarah Chiang (FIDE 2056, USA) Julia Alboredo (FIDE 1813, BRA) World Youth 2011 (2), 11.19.2011


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 g6 4. e4 Bg7 The King’s Indian Defense is a popular,


complicated, and somewhat antiposi- tional opening.


5. Be2 0-0 6. Nf3 e5 7. d5 The Petrosian Variation, named after


the former world champion, the late great Tigran Petrosian.


7. ... a5 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bh4 Bd7 With 9. ... g5 10. Bg3 Nh5 11. Nd2 Nf4


12. 0-0, White has the positional idea of Bg4 or play on the queenside.


10. Nd2 Na6 11. a3 Qe8 12. b3 Nh7 13. f3 g5?! This move weakens crucial light


squares near Black’s kingside. Better is 13. ... h5!? 14. Rb1 Nc5 15. 0-0 Bh6 16. Qc2 f5 17. b4 axb4 18. axb4 Na4 19. Nb5 with some advantage for White.


14. Bf2 f5 15. exf5 Bxf5


r+-+qtrk+ +pzp-+-vln n+-zp-+-zp zp-+Pzplzp- -+P+-+-+ zPPsN-+P+- -+-sNLvLPzP tR-+QmK-+R


After 15. ... Bxf5


Black has given White a strong out- post on e4 for no good reason.


16. Nde4 Nf6 17. Bd3 Bg6 18. 0-0 Nh5 19. c5!? I felt that Black’s lack of active play


means White was better off keeping the tension. 19. Rb1! followed by b3-b4 leaves the Na6 looking ridiculous was the patient approach. It’s hard to find a decent plan for Black.


19. ... Nxc5 20. Nxc5 dxc5 21. Bxc5 e4!? Why not? Black confuses the issue.


22. Bb5 Safer was 22. Nxe4!? Bxa1 23. Qxa1


with White still holding on to a slight advantage.


22. ... c6 23. dxc6 Bxc3 24. cxb7 Qxb5 25. Qd5+


(see diagram top of next page) Chess Life — February 2012 33


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