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After 15. Bc2


break open the center. 16. Rad1 Thinking about cracking open the d-file.


16. ... Qc7 17. Bb3 Aiming for the f7-weak spot so he can’t


castle queenside (17. dxc5 dxc5 and not much play on the d-file. 18. Qd6 Rc8).


17. ... Nf6? Goes back again to try to attack pawns.


18. f3 0-0


Brings his king to relative safety so that he can try something in the center. 19. Ng4 Nxg4 He doesn’t really have a choice. (19. ...


Rad8 20. Nxh6+ [20. Bxg5 hxg5 21. Qxg5 also a possibility] 20. ... Bxh6 21. Bxg5 Bg7 22. h6 Bh8 23. Bxf6 Bxf6 24. Nh5 Bh8 25. Qg5+ Ng6 26. Qxg6+).


20. fxg4 cxd4?!


A bad move, he has to play 20. ... c4 to lock out my key bishop. 21. cxd4 d5? Looks good, but White is better devel-


oped so any center break is bad for Black. 22. Nf5


Getting the knight out of the queen’s


range. 22. ... Nxf5 Pretty much forced because I can take


out his good bishop and have some sacrifice ideas.


23. gxf5 (see diagram top of next column


23. ... Bf6 Has to stop the powerful f6 from trap-


ping is bishop. (23. ... dxe4 24. f6 Bh8 25. Bxg5 hxg5 26. Qxg5+ Kh7 27. Be6 Bc8 28. Rc1; 23. ... Rfe8 24. f6 Bf8 25. exd5 e4 26. Rf5 White is still better because of more space and potential sacs on g5; 23. ... Rad8 24. f6 Bh8 25. dxe5 dxe4 26. Bd4).


uschess.org


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After 23. gxf5


24. dxe5 Qxe5 25. exd5 Qg3? Maybe a better defense could have been


offered. 25. ... Qd6 blockades the pawn and keeps on applying pressure.


26. Bd4 Bd8 27. Qc3 Qh4 Trying to come up with something.


28. Bg7 Not the most precise, but I felt the


endgame was winning after 28. ... Rc8 29. Qd4 Qxd4+ 30. Bxd4.


28. ... b5?


No better is 28. ... Re8 29. Bh8 f6 30. Bxf6 Bxf6 31. Qxf6.


29. Bxf8 Bb6+ 30. Bc5 Rc8 31. Bxb6 Rxc3 32. bxc3 Qg4


A little better is 32. ... g4, but he is still lost. 33. Rd4. 33. Rde1 Kh7 34. f6, Black resigned. White is completely winning since when


his rook arrives on e7 his bishop can check on c2 and eventually he will dou- ble up on the e-file and play Re8.


Many parents of children who com-


peted in the K-12 Championships in Dallas this year said they believe strongly in the benefits of hired coaches. Dilesh Bansal, a management consult-


ant in Dallas and father of first-grade, first-place winner Aryaman Bansal, is not one of them. “I have strong opinions on this, and I


have surveyed so many chess parents here in Dallas so I will say this,” Bansal said. “For my son, Aryaman, I self coach.” He relates that he hired three different


coaches on different occasions, paying them each for about two or three lessons for Aryaman. “But I did not find value for money in


them at $50 an hour,” Bansal said. “Using tactics books, online video lessons is much better.” Whatever one thinks about Bansal’s disdain for hired chess coaches, the fact remains that his son not only took first place in the first grade section, but did so by achieving a perfect score.


Elephant Gambit (C40) Aryaman Bansal (1413) Rishith Susarla (1422) National K-12 Championships, Round 6 Notes by Bansal


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 Bd6 He plays an opening that I don't know!


4. Nc3 Nf6 5. Bb5+ c6 6. dxc6 bxc6 7. Bc4 0-0 8. 0-0 e4


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After 8. ... e4


9. Nd4? My best move is 9. Ng5 Bxh2+ 10. Kxh2


Ng4+ 11. Kg1 Qxg5 (11 ... Qd6 12. g3?? Qh6) 12. d4 Qh5 13. Bf4.


9. ... Bxh2+ 10. Kxh2 Qxd4


My opponent missed the Greek-gift mating line. 11. d3 Qe5+ 12. g3 Ng4+? Too late for the Greek gift; there is no


Chess Life — February 2012 39


Bansal’s father estimates that in the past


year, Aryaman has spent about 300 hours on study, another 300 hours at or traveling to tournaments, and about 200 hours of “just fun play-chess-at-home time.” “This last part does not contribute to


chess, and is just poor discipline on our part,” Bansal explains apologetically. In his peer group, Bansal’s son is a rel-


ative rarity in that his only coach is his dad. “Almost all my son’s chess friends have coaches weekly, though,” Bansal said. Below is an annotated game from


round six between Bansal’s son and Rishith Susarla. “I think this game was pretty good,”


Bansal said. “Short, dynamic, full of tac- tics and counterplay, with some instructive tactical errors from both sides.” The father and son regularly review Aryaman’s games together. “Any lines missed we look through using


Fritz,” Bansal says of the computer-based chess program. “The commentary is all what my son says, and I type it up in Fritz for him, mostly to remember what was going through his mind while he played the game.”


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