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2011 World Youth


snags a pawn, but Awonder elects to play it safe.


21. ... Rxe8 22. N1e2 Nxe2 23. Rxe2 Bc4 24. Red2 Be7 25. Nd5 Bxd5 26. Rxd5


White is clearly better here. Black’s


queenside will come under heavy pressure.


26. ... Rec8 27. c3 Rc6 28. Rb5 Rc7 29. Rdd5 Ra6 30. Ra5!


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After 30. Ra5


Forces the a win of clear pawn with no compensation for Black.


30. ... Rcc6 31. Rxa6 Rxa6 32. Rb5 Bg5 33. Bxg5 hxg5 34. Rxb7


Now it’s just a mopup operation.


34. ... g6 35. Kg1 Kg7 36. Kf2 Kf6 37. Ke3 Ke6 38. Kd3 f5 39. c4 Ra8 40. h3 fxe4+ 41. fxe4 Rf8 42. Rg7 Kf6 43. Ra7 Rb8 44. Kc2 Rb3 45. Rxa4 Rg3 46. b4 Rxg2+ 47. Kd1 Rg3 48. b5 Rxh3 49. b6 Rh7 50. Rb4 Rb7 51. a4 g4 52. a5 Kg5 53. Ke2 Rf7 54. b7, Black resigned.


Colle System (D05) Awonder Liang (FIDE 1872, USA) Cenker Eren Tan (FIDE Unrated, TUR) World Youth 2011 (7), 11.24.2011


This was Awonder’s seventh straight win


and virtually clinched the championship. 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 Better in this position is 3. Bg5 or 3.


Bf4, getting the bishop out before playing e2-e3.


3. ... d5 4. Bd3 c5 5. c3


The Colle System is a popular, but pas- sive opening. 5. ... Nc6 6. 0-0 Bd6 7. Nbd2 0-0 8. a3


(see diagram top of next column)


8. ... b6 There is a slight edge after 8. ... e5!?,


freeing the position.


9. b3 Qc7 10. e4 cxd4 11. cxd4 dxe4 12. Nxe4 Nxe4 13. Bxe4 Bb7 14. Bb2 Ne7! So far he is playing the moves the


32 Chess Life — February 2012


r+lwq-trk+ zpp+-+pzpp -+nvlpsn-+ +-zpp+-+- -+-zP-+-+ zP-zPLzPN+- -zP-sN-zPPzP tR-vLQ+RmK-


After 8. a3


position requires. The d5 point is an excellent outpost. 15. Rc1 Qd7 16. Bb1!


White correctly keeps this important attacking piece. 16. ... Bd5 17. Qd3 f5 18. Rce1 Nc6 Playing 18. ... Be4!? would force an


important decision for White ... sac or not sac? 19. However, after Rxe4 fxe4 20. Qxe4 g6 21. Ng5 collapsing e6 looks very good for White.


19. b4 a6 20. Bc2 Bxf3??


The beginning of a “chess blindness” combination that loses a piece and the game.


21. Qxf3 Nxd4


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After 21. ... Nxd4


22. Bxd4 Bxh2+ 23. Kxh2 Qxd4 Black must’ve been wondering, “How did this happen”?


24. Rxe6 Rad8 25. Kg1 Rc8 26. Bb3 Kh8 27. Rfe1 h6 28. Qe3 Qb2 29. Rxh6+ gxh6 30. Qxh6 mate.


Another young player that finished with


a medal was Ruifeng Li. I helped Ruifeng and his dad with some opening prepara- tion for his late-round games. I was impressed with his systematic way of studying and all the ChessBase work he had done. Having organized openings and a willingness to study will help Ruifeng’s progress a lot.


(see game top of next column)


Closed Ruy Lopez, Chigorin Defense (C96) Ruifeng Li (FIDE 1919, USA) Erdemdalai Yondonjamts (FIDE UNR, MGL) World Youth 2011 (1), 11.18.2011


Ruifeng got the ball rolling towards


medal contention with this round one win.


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. 0-0 b5 6. Bb3 Be7 7. Re1 0-0 8. h3


The so called “Anti Marshall” system is


a good way for White to channel Black into normal Ruy lines. 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 15. Be3 Bg4 16. Qd3 Rae8 is an example of main line Marshall theory. If anyone is looking for a solid defense versus 1. e4, this variation must be considered.


8. ... d6 Playing 8. ... d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5


Nxe5 11. Rxe5 Bb7 12. d3 with an improved version of the Marshall Gambit for White since his c-pawn is on c2 not hampering his development.


9. c3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Nc6 12. d5 Nb8


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After 12. ... Nb8


13. Nbd2 13. a4!? gives White a potential target


on b5 and takes advantage of Black’s suspicious move order. 13. ... Bb7 (13. ... Bd7 14. axb5 Bxb5 15. Na3 Bd7 16. Nxe5! dxe5 17. d6) 14. axb5 axb5 15. Rxa8 Bxa8 16. b4 c4 is one of my favorite Ruy Lopez games of all time, Karpov- Unzicker, Nice 1974, where White won in painful positional style.


13. ... Nbd7 14. Nf1 Nb6 15. b3 h6 16. Ng3 Kh7?!


This doesn’t feel right in principle. Black is looking for trouble from the Bc2.


17. Be3 Moving the knight with 17. Nh2!?, play-


ing for a rapid f2-f4, is a good alternative. 17. ... Re8 18. Qd2 Bf8 19. Nh2 g6 20. f4!


As a rule, White should play this when Black can’t establish a strong ... Ne5.


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