This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Chess Clubs r+-+k+-tr


pz l+pzppvlp -zp-+n+p+ +-wqN+-+- -+P+P+-+ +-+L+-+- PzP-vL-zPPzP +-tRQ+RmK-


After 14. Nd5


Nc5 18. Bxc5 Qxc5 suits White. If White wants more than repetition by 17. Bc3 Qc5 18. Bb4, he can consider 17. Ba3, but the Exchange sacrifice 17. … Nc5! 18. Nc7+ Kf8 19. Bxc5 Qxc5 20. Nxa8 Bxa8 appears adequate for Black.


15. b4 Qd8 16. f4 Qd7 17. f5 gxf5 If 17. … Bd4+ 18. Kh1 Nc7, White


should open lines with 19. Nxc7+ Qxc7 20. c5. One sample: 20. … bxc5 21. Qa4+ Kf8 22. bxc5 Bxc5 (not 22. … dxc5 23. Qxd4!) 23. Bh6+ Kg8 24. Qc4, with the deadly threat of 25. fxg6.


18. Rxf5 This gives Black a little hope of surviv-


ing by 18. … Rf8 and soon … 0-0-0. Instead, 18. exf5! Bxd5 19. cxd5 Bd4+ 20. Kh1 Nc7 21. f6! Bxf6 22. Rxf6 exf6 23. Qf3 leaves Black helpless.


18. ... Nd4 19. Rf2 b5?! Even the sturdier 19. … Nc6 20. Qh5


Ne5 won’t hold out long after 21. Be2 Rc8 22. Rc3.


20. Bc3 Be5 21. Bf1 Bxd5?! Black expects to maintain his knight at


d4 thanks to a counterthreat on the c-file. White trumps the idea with his own exploitation of the c-file.


22. cxd5 Rc8 23. Bxd4 Rxc1 24. Qxc1 Bxd4 25. Bxb5!, Black resigned.


A peculiar characteristic of title tourna-


ments is that the struggle for first place is often affected by the quest for norms. Joel Banawa and Philip Xiao Wang, co- winners of the 2010 state championship, shared the lead with Stopa entering the final round, but their top priority was to attain the IM norm of 61


⁄2 -21 ⁄2 . They cau-


tiously drew their encounter in 20 moves, reaching their goal while letting Stopa forge ahead with a last-round win. Wang, a junior star of the 1990s who


retired from chess for six years while earning a law degree, frequently scores points with alert defense. Against Tim Taylor, he snatched a pawn and landed in this complicated position.


46 Chess Life — August 2011


A complicated position Philip Xiao Wang (2413) IM Timothy Taylor (2389) 3rd Metropolitan Invitational Los Angeles, 2/24/2011


-+-+-tr-mk


pz -+-+qzpp -+-tRl+-+ +-zP-zp-+- -+-+P+-+ +-+-vL-zP- P+-wQLsn-zP +-+-+-mK-


After 29. ... Nf2 The pawn at e4 hangs and Black’s con-


trol of the f-file appears ominous, but Wang quickly extinguishes Black’s hopes.


30. Rxe6! Nh3+ White would parry 30. … Nxe4 not by


31. Qd5?? Nc3, but by 31. Qc2 Qxe6 32. Qxe4 Qxa2 33. Bd3.


31. Kg2 Qxe6 32. Qd6! To eliminate the defender of the trapped


knight. If 32. … Qxd6 33. cxd6 Rd8 34. Kxh3 Rxd6, simply 35. Bxa7 creates an unstoppable passed a-pawn.


32. ... Qc8 33. Bg4! Qa8 34. Kxh3 Rd8 35. Qxe5 Re8 36. Qf5 Rxe4 37. Bf3, Black resigned.


Banawa’s best game was this unpreten- tious victory.


Nimzo-Indian Defense (E20) Kayden Troff (2354) Joel Banawa (2422) 3rd Metropolitan Invitational Los Angeles, 2/23/2011


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Nc3


Transforming a Catalan into a branch


of the Nimzo-Indian. 6. ... Nc6 7. 0-0 Rb8 8. e3 White gets ample compensation from 8.


Qc2! 0-0 9. Rd1, planning Nf3-e5. 8. ... 0-0 9. Qe2 b5 10. a4?! The a-file matters less than the weak-


ening of b3. White should try 10. Rd1 Nd5 (else 11. e4) 11. Bd2, intending e3-e4.


10. ... a6 11. axb5 axb5 12. Rd1 Na5! 13. Ne5 Bb7 Exchanging this bishop solves most of


Black’s opening problems and nearly nul- lifies White’s compensation for the pawn.


This is luck? Roman Yankovsky (2534) Joel Banawa (2440) 4th Metropolitan Invitational, Los Angeles, 4/7/2011


-+-tR-+-+ +-+-+pmk- -+-+-+p+


pz -+-+-+- -+-+l+-+ +Ptr-+PmKp P+-+-+-+ +-+-+R+-


After 47. Rf1


47. ... f5 48. Rd7+?! White should keep the advantage by 48.


Kf4 Bc6 49. Rf2. 48. ... Kh6 49. Ra7 g5 50. Kxh3 Prudent. If White tries 50. Rxa5 g4, he


uschess.org


14. Bxb7 Rxb7 15. Qf3 Setting up a breakthrough that won’t


trouble Black. Against 15. e4, Smyslov chose 15. … Qe8 (ruling out tricks based on Ne5-c6) 16. Bg5 Nd7, when 17. Qg4 f5! 18. exf5 exf5 19. Qf3 Nxe5 20. dxe5 c6 leaves Black in command.


15. ... Rb6 16. d5?! exd5 17. Nxd5 Nxd5 18. Rxd5 Rd6!


Suddenly Black has the pawn and the ini-


tiative. He will meet 19. Rxb5 by 19. … Nb3 20. Rb1 c5, and White’s bishop is doomed.


19. e4 f6 20. Ng4 Rxd5 21. exd5 Nb3 22. Rb1 Bd2! 23. Ne3 Bxc1 24. Nf5 Qd7 25. Qg4 Kh8, White resigned.


The norms by Wang and Banawa were


the first achieved at Metropolitan Chess. Banawa did it again in April, winning the fourth invitational with an overwhelming score of 71


⁄2 -11 ⁄2 , a point above the standard. Banawa, a soft-spoken young man, was


so thrilled by his victory that he felt con- fident in saying he would obtain the IM title soon. He needs one more norm and a 2400 FIDE rating (about 20 points higher than his current rating). And he has greater ambitions. “I want to be a grandmaster.” Chess wisdom claims that the winner


is always lucky. Banawa’s luck was more bad than good, despite his impressive 2574 performance. He obtained winning positions in every game and nearly swept the tournament. He benefitted from good fortune only once, against Roman Yankovsky. Banawa had squandered a large advantage and found himself strug- gling to draw in the diagrammed position.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84