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61. ... Kd7 62. a7 Kd8 63. e6! fxe6 64. Nxe6+ Kd7 As 64. … Ke8 loses the bishop to 65. Nc7+.


65. f7, Black resigned. This ending served as a warmup for the


final round, where Sevillano had to win his fifth consecutive game to overtake Amanov.


Five in a row IM Zhanibek Amanov (2399) IM Enrico Sevillano (2558) 1st Metropolitan Invitational Los Angeles, 11/21/2010


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After 39. ... Kxf7 Knight endings are notoriously diffi-


cult, and this one taxes the ability of both players.


40. Kg2 g5 41. f3 A natural response, and sufficient to


draw. But the computer suggests the sharp 41. g4! hxg4 42. hxg5 f5 43. Kg3. Neither 43. … Ne2+ 44. Kh4 Kg6 45. Nc4 Nd4 46. Ne5+ Kg7 47. Nc4 nor 43. … Kg6 44. Kf4 Ne2+ 45. Ke5 g3 46. fxg3 Nxg3 47. Kf4 Ne2+ 48. Kf3 Nd4+ 49. Kf4 makes progress for Black.


41. ... Ke7 42. Kf2 Ke6 Black sets a trap by spending an extra


move to bring his king to e6. 43. Kg2?? And White falls into it! The easiest route


to a draw is 43. hxg5 fxg5 44. f4 gxf4 45. gxf4 Kf6 (or 45. … Nf5 46. Nc4) 46. Kg2 Kg6 47. Kf2 h4 48. Kg2 Nf5 49. Nc4 Kh5 50. Kh3, when Black cannot exploit his outside passed pawn.


43. ... gxh4 44. gxh4 White cannot escape by 44. g4 hxg4 45.


fxg4 f5! 46. gxf5+ Nxf5 47. Nc4 because 47. … Kd5 48. Kh3 Nd6! 49. Nxa5 Kc5 traps White’s knight.


44. ... Nf5 Offering a trade that White cannot


accept: 45. Nxf5 Kxf5 46. Kf1 Kf4 47. Kf2 f5 48. Ke2 Kg3 49. Ke3 Kxh4 50. Kf4 Kh3 51. Kxf5 h4 52. Kg5 Kg3, and Black will promote the h-pawn.


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45. Nc4 Nxh4+ 46. Kf2 Nf5 47. Nxa5 Nd4? Now Black slips. His knight at f5 and


passed h-pawn limit White’s king, so Black can invade on the queenside by 47. ... Kd5! 48. Nc4 Kd4.


48. Kg3 Kf5 49. Nc4? It’s doubtful if Black can force a win


after 49. Nb7! Nxc2 50. Nc5. 49. ... Nxc2 50. Nb2


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After 50. Nb2 Now White sets a trap. The immediate


50. Kh4 doesn’t work because of 50. … Kf4 51. Kxh5 Kxf3 52. Kg6 f5!, counting on 53. Kxf5 Ne3+.


50. ... h4+? And Black falls into it! Nobody can


handle a tricky ending at 30 seconds per move. Black could win with 50. … Ke5 51.


Nd3+ Kd4 52. Nxb4 Nxb4 53. Kh4 Ke3 54. Kxh5 f5! 55. Kg5 f4, preserving his last pawn. Or, if 52. Nf4 f5 53. Kh4 Kc3 54. Kxh5 Kxb3 55. Nd5 Ka3 56. Kg5 b3 57. Kxf5 b2 58. Nc3, Black wins by chasing White’s knight: 58. … Kb3 59. Nb1 Na3 60. Nd2+ Kc2.


51. Kxh4 Kf4 52. Kh5 f5 Also 52. … Kxf3 53. Kg6 should draw.


53. Kg6 Ne1 54. Kf6 Nxf3 55. Nd3+ Ke4 56. Nxb4 Nd4 57. Kg5 f4


First place is within reach. If White


finds 58. Kg4 Nxb3 59. Nd3! f3 60. Kg3, or 58. Kg4 f3 59. Kg3 Ke3 60. Nd5+ Ke2 61. Nf4+ Ke1 62. Nh3, he will secure the decisive half-point.


58. Nd3?? Ne6+!, White resigned. The second invitational honored Jimmy


Quon, a popular chess teacher who passed away in June. With the requisite three grand- masters (GMs) and an average rating of 2420, the event offered both GM and inter- national master norms. No title seeker came close, though. Nor was there much excite- ment in the race for first place, as GM Mark Paragua won his first six games and coasted to victory. Paragua, the top Filipino until teenager Wesley So emerged, displayed his attacking skill against Amanov.


The race to first IM Zhanibek Amanov (2399) GM Mark Paragua (2646) Jimmy Quon Memorial Los Angeles, 1/21/2011


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After 25. h3 White needs just one move (Bc1-e3) to


solidify his position, but Black strikes first. 25. ... Bh5! 26. Rd2?! Very undesirable, as White’s queen-


side pieces are shut out of action. Nor does 26. Rd3 Ne5 27. Rg3 help, as 27. … Nf3+! lets Black’s queen enter at g3. White must wreck his pawn structure by 26. Ne2 Ne4 27. Be3 Bxe3 28. fxe3, although he obtains no compensating activity.


26. ... Ne5 27. Ne4 White can avoid a kingside attack by


27. Nd4 Rd8 28. Ncb5, blocking the a7- g1 diagonal. However, 28. … Bb6 29. Kh1 Ba5 30. Nc3 Bg6 leaves him vulnerable at d3 and still undeveloped.


27. ... Nxe4 28. Qxe4 Nf3+! 29. gxf3 Qg3+ 30. Kf1 Qxh3+ 31. Ke2 Qg2


Also crushing is 31. … Qh2 32. Nd4 Rad8.


32. Qh4 Bxf3+ 33. Kd3 Rad8+ 34. Kc3 Rxd2 35. Bxd2 Bxf2 36. Qg5 Bg4!


An unusual but very effective attacking


move. Black threatens to check the king on the third rank or to trap White’s queen by 37. … f6 38. Qf4 e5.


37. Bb1 Against 37. Qe5, most persuasive is


another retreat, 37. … Bh4. Or, if 37. Re1 f6 38. Qf4 Rd8 39. Qe4 Qh3+, White must yield material.


37. ... Qh3+ 38. Bd3 Bf5, White resigned. Alessandro Steinfl scored only two


points, but his two wins were among the tournament’s best games. The first fea- tures a sacrificial attack.


Scandinavian Defense (B01) Robby Adamson (2402) Alessandro Steinfl (2272) Jimmy Quon Memorial Los Angeles, 1/20/2011


Chess Life — August 2011 43


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