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lose my two-bishop advantage. On the plus side, Black’s king- side is weakened and that weakness comes into play later.


18. Bg3 Nh5 19. Rab1 AD—Not unreasonable here


is 19. Nh1 f5 20. Qc2 Qe6 21. Rad1 which keeps a White edge. BR—I am preparing b5 in


order to push Black’s light bishop off any useful diagonal. But Black threatens to strangle my dark bishop with ...


19. ... f5 20. b5 Nxg3 BR—I was expecting 20. ...


f4 which I had calculated as 21. bxc6 fxg3 22. cxd7 gxf2+ with a resulting battle over loose pawns all over the board.


21. hxg3 Qxc5 BR—Black seizes the oppor-


tunity to grab the c-pawn, although I’m not sure that 21. ... Ba8 and pushing the e- pawn wouldn’t create problems for White in the center. AD—21. ... Ba8 22. Rbc1 e4


23. c6 Ne5 24. Rfd1 Rbd8 25. Qc5 is OK for White.


22. Qxc5 Nxc5 23. Rfc1 Bb7 24. Rxc5 Bxa6


BR—A pawn down and two


choices of which pawn to cap- ture, the one on c7 or d5. 25. Rxd5 looks good but 25. ... c6 26. Rxe5 Bxb5 looks like it frees up Black’s bishop and allows Black’s rooks to become active. 25. Rxc7 seems okay, but allows Black’s central pawn to roll forward. I thought about 25. a4 but 25. ... Bb7 26. Rxc7 Rf7 27. Rbc1 seems to allow Black to push 27. ... e4 and mess up the center. So I decided to attack a third pawn, the one on a7.


25. Rb4 Bb7 26. Ra4 a6 AD—Losing is 26. ... Rf7 27.


Rxa7 Kg7 28. a4 Kf6 29. a5 d4 30. exd4 exd4 31. a6 Ba8 32. g4 fxg4 33. Nxg4+ Ke6 34. b6.


27. bxa6 Ra8 BR—I could push the pawn


to a7, but it seems wise to unleash my dormant knight on Black’s central pawn structure. AD—28. a7 Rf7 29. Nd3 e4 30. Nb4 c6 31. Kf2 is also strong.


28. Nd3 Bxa6 29. Nxe5 Bc4 30. Rb4 BR—Here I had gambled


uschess.org


that Black wasn’t going to play 30. ... Rxa3 which allows White to play 31. Rxc7 and allow White’s rooks on the sev- enth rank where a mating net with White’s knight at e5, posi- tioned to jump to g6 or f7, would be possible.


30. ... Rfe8 31. Nxc4 dxc4 32. a4 Rxe3 33. Rbxc4 Ra7


BR—Now I am happy,


was 38. ... gxf3, forcing White to give some rook checks before retaking with gxf3. Now, White can take Black’s g- pawn, force a rook exchange, block Black’s advance of the c- pawn and have free reign to push his trio of kingside pawns. AD—White is winning after


38. ... gxf3 39. Rg7+ Kh8 40. gxf3 Ra2 41. Rg8+ Kh7 42. R5g7+ Kh6 43. g4 R2a5 44. g5+.


Golden Knights Champions 1945


1946


1947/8 1949 1950 1951


1952-3 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960


1961-2 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


1974 1975 1976


C. F. Rehberg Richard Aiken


Leon Stolzenberg James T. Sherwin Leon Stolzenberg John Staffer Ignas Zalys R. Klugman Hans Berliner Hans Berliner R. E. Doe J. Witecek


Hans Berliner


Leon Stolzenberg Lionel Joyner Gary Abram


Anton Sildmets Brian Owens Harry Mayer William Gray


Kenneth Collins Robert Burns Juris Jurevics Robert Cross R. Cayford


R. Cayford, George Krauss, William Maillard


Ben. Bednarz Rob Salgado K. Reddinger


although I have doubled pawns and my a-pawn is not long for this world when Black plays ... Ra3. But Black can’t really defend his f5-pawn, my a-pawn is (temporarily) passed and Black’s earlier mentioned kingside pawn weakness is vulnerable to attack if I can get my rooks in motion.


34. Rxf5 Ra3 35. Rc6 R3xa4 36. Rxh6 g4


BR—Hoping for tripled


pawns? I don’t think so. 37. Rg6+ Kh7 38. Rfg5 c5


Probably better for Black


1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982


1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990


1991 1992


1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004


running may well have sharp- ened Don’s mind. Here is an example of that sharpness as he nurses home two bishops.


Scandinavian Defense (B01) Don Schultheis (2371) James Tracz (2351) 2004 Golden Knights final


Tom Sweeney Richard Aiken Tom Friedel Gary Kubach Tom Friedel


1st-3rd S. Kowalski, S. Sinding, M. Vaughan


Rob Salgado


Edmund Hermelyn Andre Reichman Mike Colucci


Stanley Elowitch Curtis Jones Jon Applebee


John Penquite; Murray Kurtz


Joseph Schwing


Edward Duliba and Charles van Buskirk


Anthony Eaker Robert Ilderton Robert Keating Robert Keating Chris O'Connell Corky Schakel John Burton Abe Wilson John Burton Chuck Cullum John Menke Chuck Cullum


39. Rxg4 Rxg4 40. Rxg4 Rc7 41. Rc4 Kg6 42. Kf2 Kg5 43. g4, Black resigned.


Don Schultheis Don Schultheis has made a


habit of finishing in the money. Don finished third in the 2002 event, dropped to eighth in the 2003 Golden Knights, and has returned to third place in the 2004. As of late, Don has added a new sport to his cor- respondence chess—he has become a marathon runner. Mens sana in copore sano is the old Latin motto—sound in body, sound in mind and the


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 c6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bc4 Bf5 7. Ne5 e6 8. g4 Bg6 9. h4 Nbd7 10. Nxd7 Nxd7 11. h5 Be4 12. Rh3 Bd5 13. Bd3 0 -0-0 14. Kf1 Bd6 15. Bd2 Qc7 16. Nxd5 exd5 17. Qf3


White has “won” the two


bishops, but his pieces lack coordination. Chances are about even.


17. ... Nf8 18. Re1 Kb8 It looks like 18. ... Ne6 was


a major improvement.


19. Bg5 Rc8 20. h6 g6 21. c4 Ne6 22. Rxe6 fxe6 23. c5 Bxc5 24. dxc5 e5


The two bishops are better


than the rook and pawn here as the rooks have little scope.


25. Qf6 Rhf8 26. Qd6 Rce8 27. Be2 Kc8 28. Ra3 a6 29. Qxc7+ Kxc7 30. Kg2 Rf7 31. Rb3 Kc8 32. Kg3 Ref8 33. f3 Re8 34. Bd2 Rd7 35. g5 Rf7 36. Bf1 Ref8 37. a3 Re8 38. Re3 Kb8 39. Bc3 Rfe7 40. Re1 Kc7 41. b4 Re6 42. Bd3 R6e7 43. Kg4


-+-+r+-+ +pmk-tr-+p p+p+-+pzP +-zPpzp-zP- -zP-+-+K+


Pz -vLL+P+- -+-+-+-+ +-+-tR-+-


After 43. Kg4


43. ... b5 Black cracks under pres-


sure and the bishops show their bite. Black had to con- tinue to play passively and make White find the way in by Bc2 and f4.


44. cxb6+ e.p. Kxb6 45. Re2 Re6 46. Be1 Kb7 47. Bf2 Rf8 48. Bc5 Rd8 49. a4 Ree8 50. Re1 Re6 51. f4 e4 52. Be2 Ree8 53. f5 gxf5+ 54. Kxf5 d4 55. Kf4 d3 56. Bh5 d2 57. Rd1 e3 58. Bxe3 Re7 59. Bxd2, Black resigned.


. Chess Life — August 2011 31


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