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Benko’s Bafflers Most of the time these studies


resemble positions that could actu- ally occur over-the-board. Youmust simply reach a theoretically won or drawn position for White. Solutions can be found on page


79. Please e-mail submissions for


Benko’s Bafflers to: pbenko@uschess.org


Problem I I. Kashdan-I.A. Horowitz (1928)


+ + + + White to play and win


Blunder! GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2774) GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2808) 20th Amber Blindfold


+ + + RR + +p+p+ +l+ P + P + + +


P + +KPP + +r+ + + + + +


White to play This is an easy winning position for


White. However, he is entertaining the false belief that Black has a bishop on c4.


70. Rc7? Having the right position in mind, the


same idea with the mate threat 70. Rb7 Kg8 71. Rxb5 would have ended the game.


70. ... Kg8 There was still the opportunity to


improve his position with 71. Rcg7+, but instead …


71. Rc4?? Bxc4 …happened andWhite resigned. Sim-


ilar oversights happened to other players.


Rook behind passed pawn GM Veselin Topalov (FIDE 2775) GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2808) 20th Amber Blindfold


(see diagramtop of next column)


42. Rc6 A quick draw is 42. Rc5 Rh3+ (42. ... a3


43. Rxd5) 43. Kd2 a3 44. Kc2—maybe White was dreaming of a win?


42. ... a3 43. f5? Either 43. Kf3 or 43. Ra6 would still


uschess.org + r k +


+ + + + p+ + + + +k+ + + + + + + + + + + P


N + + + + K +


Problem II D. Blundell (1994)


+ + + + + + + +


+ + + + +N+ + + +K+ + + White to play and win


+ + + k + + + +


+ +p+ + p+ P P + + R K + + + + r + + + +


White to play


have led to easily drawn positions. 43. ... Rh6! Wake up time has arrived forWhite. He


now has to fight for the draw. 44. Rc1? An elementary error! White should


place the rook behind the passed-pawn! So 44. Rc7+! Kf6 45. Rc5 Rh1 46. Ra5 Ra1 (46. Kg5) 47. Kd3 would still draw.


+ + + + + + k +


R +p+P+ + P + +


p +K+ + + + + + r + + +


Analysis after 47. Kd3


44. ... Ra6 45. Kd3 a2 46. Ra1 Kf6 47. Kc3 Kxf5 48. Kb2 Ke4 The rest is on automatic pilot since


any pawn ending is lost for White.


49. Re1+ Kxd4 50. Ka1 Kc3 51. Rc1+ Kd2 52. Rc2+ Kd3 53. Rc3+ Ke4 54. Rh3 d4 55. Rh4+ Kd3 56. Rh3+ Kc4 57. Rc3+ Kd5 58. Rh3 Rb6 59. Kxa2 Kc4 60. Rh1 Kc3,White resigned.


+ + + + + + + +


Geometrical motif GM Magnus Carlsen (FIDE 2815) GM Viswanathan Anand (2817) 20th Amber Blindfold


+ + k + + + +pp


p +RP + +P+pp +


+ + + + P+P+ KPP +r+ + +


Black to play


36. ... Rb2? Instead of pawn hunting, making the


most of the strength of his advanced passed pawns could have won quickly. 36. ... e3+! 37. Ke2 Rg1 38. Kf3 Rf1+, etc.


37. Rd4! Eliminates the above danger.


37. ... Rxc2+ 38. Kf1 f3 39. gxf3 exf3 40. Rd6 g5 41. Rxh6 Rxa2 42. h3 a4 43. Rf6??


There was no time for this. Instead,


43. Ra6 Ra1! (43. ... Rh2 44. Rxa3 Rxh3 45. Ra3) 44. Kf2 a3 45. c5 a2 46. c6 was still equal since the white pawn would have arrived just in time.


43. ... Ra1+ 44. Kf2 a3 45. Ra6 a2,White resigned.


He gives up because the well-known 46.


c5 Rh1 47. Rxa2 Rh2+ geometricalmotif wins. White woke up too late.


.


See more about the Melody Amber Tournament on Chess Life Online, March archives, at uschess.org, including a report by Macauley Peterson about Hikaru Nakamura’s “A First and Final Trip to Amber.” Also see the official website, amberchess20.com.


Chess Life — August 2011 55 + + + +


+ + p +k + +Pp +


+ + + +


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