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After 18. ... Qxe5


a passer. So, taking with the bishop is out. (Not so. Yes, in the endgame a rook plus


two pawns is usually stronger than bishop plus knight duo, but, thanks to weak squares around the black king, and thus a weak back rank, it’s only White who may have some winning chances after 21. Kg2 or 21. Ng5!?—L.A.) This leaves knight takes or rook takes.


If 19. Nxe5 then Black has 19.…Rxd4 20. gxf5 exf5 21. Nxc6 Rxe2 22. Nxd4 which leaves Black up the Exchange with a rook to a knight. However, if 19. Rxe5 then it goes like this:


19. Rxe5 f6 20. Rc5 e5 21. gxf5 exd4 22. fxg6 hxg6 23. Rxc6 Kf7


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After 23. ... Kf7 Here I’monly down a pawn and can win


probably either d4 or a7, creating an “even” gamematerially, but I will need to make no mistakes if I am to win from here. Going after a7 loses: 24. Rc7+ Re7, so White goes for the d4-pawn. White should think here, not “to win”,


but “not to lose.” His 24. Rc4 is a serious mistake allowing Black to exchange White’s “unique” (only) rook, which leads straight to losing the a-pawn, and the game. White holds, easily, with 24. Ra6 Rd7 25. Ra4, tying up Black’s forces.


24. Rc4 Rc8 (!—L.A.) 25. Rxc8 Rxc8 26. Nxd4 Rc3 27. Kf1 Ra3 28. Ke2 Rxa2


So Black wins a pawn, giving him the


winning material here. However, I have two connected passers, so it isn’t over yet.


29. Ke3 a5 30. c4 Ra3 31. Nb5 Rb3 32. Nd4 uschess.org + rr+ +


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After 32. Nd4


32. ... Rb8 After 32. ... Rb2, Black should win. He


doesn’t need his rook to stop the c-pawn (thewrong idea behind 32. ... Rb8?)—this can be easily done by the black king.


33. Nc6 Ra8 34. Kd2 a4 35. Kc2 Ke6 36. Kb2 Kd6 37. Nb4 Kc5 38. Ka3 Kd4 39. h4 f5 40. Ka2 f4 41. Ka3 f3 42. Ka2


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After 42. Ka2


42. ... Kc3 Thismove alsowins, but simplerwas an


immediate ... Rh8 (rather than on the next move) or 42. ... Re8, going straight for the f2-pawn.


43. Ka3 Rh8 Here, Black gets greedy and makes a


fatal mistake. Black probably wants me to just take a4, but that loses to 44. Kxa4 Ra8+ 45. Kb5 Rb8+ 46. Kc6 Rxb4. So I cannot take the pawn, but I don’t have to. This isn’t a truemistake, but stronger—


and more logical, to follow on 42. ... Kc3, was to go for the f-pawnwith the king: 43: ... Kd2. But the best for Black was to repeat the position: 43. ... Kd4 44. Ka2, and now44. ... Re8 (seemy note to 42. ... Kc3).


44. c5 Rxh4 45. c6 Rh8 The knight is—and will remain—


untouchable. 46. Kxa4 Ra8+ Black must create a passer: 46. ... g5,


with a likely draw, or 46. ... Kd2. 47. Kb5 Rb8+ 48. Kc5 Rxb4 49. c7!!


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The d3-pawn conveniently protects the


c4-square from the rook, and the rook cannotmove to b8, so I get a queen here.


49. ... Rb2 50. c8=Q Kxd3 51. Qd8+ Ke2 52. Kc4


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After 52. Kc4 Black cannot take the pawn here: 52.


… Kxf2 53. Qd4!+ winning the rook. 52. ... Rd2 53. Qg5 Again, Black cannot take the pawn.


53. ... Rc2+ 54. Kb3 Rd2 55. Kc3 Rd3+ 56. Kc2 Rd7


Here I miss 57. Qb5+ Kxf2 58. Qxd7, but it isn’t a big deal.


57. Qe3+ Kf1 58. Qxf3 Rd4 59. Qg3 Ra4 60. f3 g5 61. Qxg5 Ra2+ 62. Kd3 Ra3+ 63. Ke4 Ra4+ 64. Ke3 Ra3+ 65. Kf4 Kf2 66. Qc5+, Black resigned.


Woodward’s maximal effort certainly succeeded. .


Send in your games! If you are unrated or were rated


1799 or below on your Chess Life (CL) label, then GMLev Alburt invites you to send your most instructive game with notes to:


Back to Basics, c/o Chess Life PO Box 3967 Crossville, TN 38557-3967


Or e-mail your material to backtobasics@uschess.org


GM Alburt will select the “most


instructive” game and CL will award an autographed copy of Lev’s newest book, Chess Training Pocket Book II (by Lev Alburt and Al Lawrence) to the person submitting the most in- structive game and annotations.


Do not send games with only a


fewnotes, as they are of little instruc- tive value and can’t be used.Writing skills are a plus, but instructiveness is a must! Make sure your game (or part of it) and your notes will be of interest to other readers.


Chess Life — August 2011 53 + Q + +


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