This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
35. d5! Menke engineers a decisive


breakthrough combination that leaves him with an ambi- tious a-pawn.


35. ... exd5 36. Nxd5 cxd5 37. Rxb4 Qxb4 38. Qc7+ Qe7 39. Qxb8 Bc6


If Black was counting on 39.


... Bc4, 40. Rb1 would be painful. Now Menke’s iron technique comes into play.


40. Qb2 Ra4 41. Bd4 Rb4 42. Qc3 Rc4 43. Qb2 Rb4 44. Qd2 Rc4 45. Qf4 Qe4


The bishops of opposite color won’t save Black.


46. Qxe4 dxe4 47. Be3 Rc2 48. Ra1 Bd5 49. a4 Ra2 50. Rxa2 Bxa2 51. h4 Kg6 52. Kf1 Kf5 53. Bd4 Bc4+ 54. Ke1 Bd5 55. a5 e3


Equally futile is 55. ... g5 56. h5 g4 57. h6 Kg6 58. Be3.


56. f3 Bb7 57. Bxe3 Kg6 58. Ke2 Ba6+ 59. Kd2 Kh5 60. g3 Bb7 61. Ke2 Ba6+ 62. Kf2 Bb5 63. Bc5 Ba6 64. Bf8 Kg6 65. g4 Kf7 66. Ba3 g6 67. f4 Bc8 68. Kf3 Bb7+ 69. Ke3 Bc8 70. f5!


The final blow—the two rook pawns will dominate the bishop.


70. ... gxf5 71. gxf5 Kg7 72. Kf4 Ba6 73. Bb2 Kf7 74. h5, Black resigned.


Laurence Bonsack Second place was earned by


Laurence Bonsack of North Highlands, California. Laurence Bonsack is a 58-


year-old retired chemical engi- neer who plays CC because he finds it a great way to experiment with different openings and an excellent way to develop analytical abilities. Due to the demands of his work, Laurence had little time for over-the-board (OTB) chess, but he plans to compete OTB in 2011. He will continue to play correspondence, he notes, as it has been a great fit for him. His second place fin- ish was achieved with consistency—5½-½ in the pre- liminary round, 5½-½ in the semifinal, and an undefeated 5-1 in the finals. Here is Lau- rence’s play from the final round showing his strong defensive skills.


uschess.org


Bird’s Opening (A02) Robert Hampton (2240) Laurence Bonsack (2174) 2003 Golden Knights finals


1. f4 e5 2. fxe5 d6 3. exd6 Bxd6 4. Nf3 g5 5. g3 g4 6. Nh4 Ne7 7. d4 Ng6 8. Nxg6 hxg6 9. Qd3 Nc6 10. c3 Qe7 11. Bg2 Bf5 12. Qe3


The usual line here is 12. e4


with complications favorable to White after 12. ... 0-0-0 13. 0-0 Ne5 14. Qe3 Bd7 15. Nd2 Bb5 16. Re1, but Hampton’s choice seems worth trying again.


12. ... Qxe3 13. Bxe3 Rxh2 14. Bxc6+ bxc6 15. Rxh2 Bxg3+ 16. Rf2 0-0-0 17. Nd2 Rh8 18. Nf1 Rh1 19. 0-0-0 Bxf2 20. Bxf2 Be6 21. b3 f5 22. Be3 Rh3 23. Kd2


-+k+-+-+


pz -zp-+-+- -+p+l+p+ +-+-+p+- -+-zP-+p+ +PzP-vL-+r P+-mKP+-+ +-+R+N+-


After 23. Kd2 The early battle has clearly


gone to White, and now Bon- sack has the clearly unpleasant task of fighting a master while down a piece in an endgame. This is where heart makes a difference.


23. ... g3 24. Bf4 g2 25. Ne3 g5! 26. Nxg2


After 26. Bxg5 Rg3 27. Rg1


Rxg5 28. Rxg2 it is still a struggle.


26. ... Bd5 27. Bxg5 Bxg2 28. Rg1 Bd5 29. Bf4 Rh4 30. Be5 Rg4 31. Rxg4


White would like to avoid


this exchange, but his rook has nowhere else to go.


31. ... fxg4 32. Kd3 Bg2 33. e4 c5! 34. dxc5 c6 35. Bg3 Kd7 36. Ke3 Bf3 37. Kf4 Ke6 38. b4 Be2 39. Ke3 Bc4 40. a3 a6 41. Kf4 Bd3 42. Bh2 Be2 43. Ke3 Bc4 44. Kd4 Be2 45. c4


White prepares the break on b5, but Black can handle it.


45. ... Bf1 46. a4 Be2 47. Kc3 Bf1 48. b5 cxb5 49. cxb5 axb5 50. a5 Kd7 51. e5 Kc6 52. Kb4 Bc4 53. a6 Be6 54. a7 Kb7 55. c6+ Kxa7


56. Kxb5 Kb8 57. Kb6 Kc8 58. Bg3 Kb8 59. c7+ Kc8 60. Kc6 Bd7+ 61. Kd6 Be8 62. Ke7 Bh5 63. e6 Bg6 64. Kf6 Bh5 65. Kg5 Be8 66. Kxg4 Bg6, Adjudicated a draw.


After the white king gets to


f8, the bishop stays on the e8- h5 diagonal to insure the draw.


Tom Connelly Thomas Connelly is a retired


62-year old attorney living in Newport News, Virginia. Tom’s retirement present was a 2003 Corvette convertible which he enjoys driving with the top down. When he is not working out a chess move, he enjoys reading novels and science magazines. He and his wife are also proud servants to four household cats. His record in 2004 was 11 wins, four draws, and one loss, two of his draws being with second place winner Laurence Bonsack. His single loss was to 2000 Golden Knights winner Abe Wilson. Tom began playing CC in


1973 to improve his OTB play, which it did. He continued with postal play reaching a plateau. After his retirement, however, he left that plateau for new heights—his master’s rating by CC. Tom’s advice to aspiring players—work hard at putting up a tough defense in poor and even very poor positions.


Reti Opening (A07) Steven Jacobs (1991) Thomas Connelly (2146) 2003 Golden Knights final


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d3 d5 3. c3 Nc6 4. g3 e5 5. Bg2 Be7 6. 0-0 0-0 7. e4


Petrosian-Geller, Moscow


1950, continued 7. Bg5. Jacobs’ move causes White some problems.


7. ... dxe4 8. dxe4 Bg4 9. Qc2 Qd7 10. Bg5 Rad8 11. Nbd2 Qd3 12. Qxd3 Rxd3 13. Ne1 Rd7 14. f3 Bc5+ 15. Kh1 Be6 16. Nb3 Bb6 17. Bxf6 gxf6 18. Nc2 a5 19. Rfd1?


(see diagram top of next column) Wrong rook—now White is


lost.


19. ... Rfd8 20. Rxd7 Rxd7 21. Re1 a4 22. Nc1 Bf2 23. Rf1 Rd2


-+-+-trk+ +pzpr+p+p -vln+lzp-+


pz -+-zp-+- -+-+P+-+ +NzP-+PzP- PzPN+-+LzP Rt -+R+-+K


After 19. Rfd1


24. Na3 Rxb2! 25. Nd3 Rxa2 26. Nb1 Bb6, White resigned. White cedes the two pawns to


weaken Black’s pawn structure, but Black is left with two strong bishops while White’s knights stumble over one another.


Chuck Cullum—


2004 Champion Chuck Cullum was the win-


ner of the 2002 Golden Knights. He went undefeated in that event, winning the title by a comfortable margin, giv- ing up only four draws to finish with a 16-2 record. In the 2004 event he again remained undefeated, finishing with an impressive 15-3 record, but this time there was a dollop of luck involved. Chuck began by scoring 5½-½ in the preliminary round, ced- ing a draw to expert Steve Fairbairn of Canada. In round two Chuck continued his unbeaten streak with two wins and four draws in a field that averaged 2234. But a score of 4-2 is not sufficient to advance a player to the final round of a Golden Knights tournament. Chuck was out of the finals. Or so it appeared. It takes seven players to make up a finals section and for the last final section of the 2004 Golden Knights, only four players had qualified. Three more players had to be invited from the ros- ter of players scoring 4-2, and so Chuck Cullum was back in, and Chuck took full advan- tage of his second chance, scoring 5½-½ in the final round to eke out a second Golden Knights victory. Chuck thus improved the folk wis- dom—If you can’t be good, be lucky, and if you can’t be lucky, be good, by being both lucky and good and the 2004 Golden Knights champion.


Chess Life — August 2011 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84