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PRODUCTS This orange won’t peel


Launched at the Birmingham Totally Shows in February Jaffa tape is not only thicker, stronger and more waterproof than other Gaffa tapes on the market it also, says Everbuild Building Products, has the most amazing adhesive quality.


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his product is definitely no lemon, according to Leeds, UK based Everbuild. “Unlike normal Gaffa tape, when you join a tarpaulin in wet and cold conditions, you can be confident that new Jaffa Tape won’t let you down, so come Monday morning, after a particularly wet or windy


weekend, you’ll be pleased to see that they’ve stayed stuck!” Jaffa Tape has a multitude of uses including waterproofing and windproofing


scaffolding, windows, doors and exposed roofing – it can also be used on vertical and overhead applications due to its unique hold strength. Everbuild says Jaffa Tape can also be used to temporarily hold DPM, timber, guttering, sheet material or any other building material that needs to be held in place without the need to clamp. Jaffa Tape will stick to most surfaces and substrates and can be used internally as well as externally. Jaffa Tape is only available in orange, and comes in three sizes: 50mm x 5 metres (Mini), 50mm x 25 metres (Standard) and 75mm x 25 metres (Jumbo) – all packed in a high impact, orange peel effect, counter top display box.


Cheap clamps can be costly


Complex, high-tech expensive machinery can frequently be immobilised when an inexpensive component such as a hose clip malfunctions, causing considerable damage and often significantly threatening safety, warns the manufacturer of Jubilee®


clips.


hen failure does occur, the chances are that the clip will be sitting in one of those really awkward difficult to reach places, which can increase the time needed to fix the problem. Skimping on quality at the outset will frequently result in this type of unexpected scenario adding more to the cost than was originally anticipated. In recent years the market has been swamped by a plethora of mass-produced hose clips, which are exported to Britain from many countries around the world and users can be forgiven


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clips (manufactured in the UK by L Robinson & Co (Gillingham) Ltd since 1921), have over the years, proven to be safe, durable and capable in combating extreme clamping conditions. In fact Jubilee®


for believing that all of these producers exert the same rigorous quality and testing procedures. Jubilee®


exceeds the demands of BSI in all areas.


Poor quality of materials used in hose clip manufacture can result in thread stripping, difficulties with removal and replacement, premature corrosion and sub-standard crimping, causing the screw to retract from its housing during or after installation.


Self-sealing fasteners catalogue


APM HEXSEAL has published its latest fastener catalogue featuring its expanded full line of high-pressure, stainless steel self-sealing screws, bolts, rivets, nuts and washers in Imperial and Metric sizes.


PM HEXSEAL’s screws and bolts utilise an embedded silicone O-Ring, capable of withstanding pressure up to 20,000psi, and operate in a temperate range of -160°F to +500°F. The nuts and washers employ a molded-in elastomeric barrier that seals both the threads and through hole. A variety of sealing materials are available, including fluoro- silicone, Viton® and Buna N neoprene. All of which meet UL Recognition, RoHS, and DFARS. Several


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popular thread locking options can also be specified along with tamper-resistant drive styles. The APM self-sealing fastener line has been sold worldwide for more than fifty years under the following trademarks: SEELSKREW®, SEELBOLT®


, SEELNUT® , SEELRIVET® and SEELOC® (washer).


Their applications are used extensively for mechanical and electrical fastening on marine, automotive, aviation, test and measurement instrumentation, medical and a variety of military equipment.


152 Fastener + Fixing Magazine • Issue 68 March 2011


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